Christmas Shopping

Nine glorious digital marketing stats from the past week

We’re halfway through January already, which means it’s basically nearly Christmas again, which is exactly why we’ve got, among other things, even more holiday season digital marketing stats for you. 

Oh stop complaining.

We’re trying to educate you through the medium of data so that next Christmas you can smash your targets out of the park.

You should be out in the streets cheering our name. Or something…

Top 10 digital marketing stats of the week

Next time I bring you this weekly round-up, Black Friday will be nothing but a suppressed traumatic memory and most of you will have reduced your productivity levels by at least 75% in the run-up to Christmas.

But before we kick off the month of boozy work parties in which inappropriate things inevitably happen between colleagues, let’s give November one last bit of love with these brilliant digital marketing stats

Black Friday 2015: 16+ stats to prepare you for the big day

Black Friday is less than half a week away, which means it’s almost time to forget about the woes of the world for one day and get lost in some good-old-fashioned consumerist escapism. 

In light of this being the UK’s biggest 24 hours for ecommerce and what with us being a digital marketing blog, we thought we’d better bring you some of the best Black Friday stats we’ve seen so far. 

Why Christmas begins early for online retailers

There used to be an unspoken rule about the Christmas retail season that any ads would only begin after Bonfire Night was over. After that, the deluge began.

Unusually for today’s society, this particular season is getting longer not shorter, as advertisers and retailers inculcate in consumers the idea that Halloween is now the time when the floodwaters are unleashed.

Christmas now begins on November 1st, Hark the Herald Angels Sing! But for online retailers it comes even earlier because of the seasonal gravity of that time of year.

A bad Christmas in the age of algorithms and customer acquisition extends beyond revenues and margins; it probably spells the end.

Recent research from Ometria bears this out on data it accumulated from comparing last year’s Christmas with the first ten months of this year.

One in five US and UK consumers did all of their Christmas shopping online: stats

Christmas is always a busy time of year, so it comes as no surprise that consumers turn to ecommerce for a convenient way to get their shopping done. 

A new Econsultancy survey found that in the UK a majority of people (61%) said that they completed more than half or all of their Christmas shopping online in 2013, while just 7% completed all of their shopping offline.

In the US the results were similarly slanted in favour of ecommerce with 50% of respondents completing more than half of their Christmas shopping online.

However US consumers were also twice as likely to solely rely on brick-and-mortar stores, as 16% said they didn’t do any shopping online.

The findings come from the second annual Econsultancy Christmas 2013 Online Shopping Survey Report, which interviewed 2,000 US and UK consumers in January using Toluna QuickSurveys.