coach

How Coach uses Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+

It’s that time of the week again when we take a closer look at a major brand’s social strategy and on this occasion I’ve chosen to examine Coach.

The luxury brand has a global presence so one would assume that it has a fairly large following on social platforms.

To find out, read on for more information how Coach uses Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+. This follows on from similar posts looking at Macy’s, Red Bull, ASOS and Nike.

And for more information on the brand read our review of Coach’s ecommerce platform, which it launched way back in 1999…

Ralph Lauren and other luxury brands prove to be blasé about Facebook timeline

When Facebook timeline was first unveiled the general response from users was one of annoyance and anger at why the social network would bother to change a winning formula.

But after it was forced on everyone last year the complaining quickly died down and changed into a feeling of indifference as people realised it had little impact to how they used Facebook.

Brands were really the only Facebook users who jumped at the chance to fill out their timelines as it was a chance to trumpet their heritage, but even then the excitement was limited to a few notable examples.

Coach: almost a first class website

Coach has an ultimately frustrating website.

Don’t get me wrong, the desktop site, designed this year, isn’t presenting too many barriers to customers. It also has some nice touches that should shine in a tweaked redesign. And it has some amazing product images (of amazing products).

But, at the moment, it’s a little buggy and has a homepage lacking in features above the fold.

With a little work, the desktop ecommerce site could make content and products easier to surface, and provide a much more immersive experience.

In this post, I’m looking at the US website. If you’re not in the US, you can hit ‘global sites’ in the footer and take a look at the American view.

For those outside of the US, Coach is big, with revenue of $3.23bn in 2009. It’s big enough that when I Google simply ‘coach’ (and bear in mind I’m in the UK), I get a Google company ‘card’ on the RHS of the SERPS (see below), which I can click to take me to results more relevant to the luxury leather goods store.

So, now that I’m in the store, what does it look like?