cross selling

Can Wells Fargo’s new brand platform help it restore consumer trust?

Wells Fargo has paid a hefty price for its fake account scandal.

While the bank has fired more than 5,000 employees implicated in the scandal, clawed back $75m in compensation from executives it blamed for the fraud, and agreed to pay $110m to settle a class action lawsuit over its opening of more than a million unauthorized customer accounts, consumers apparently aren’t willing to forgive the company, at least not yet.

Wells Fargo scandal shows why banks are vulnerable to fintech startups

Wells Fargo, one of the largest and most prominent banks in the world, has been embroiled in a scandal in which thousands of its employees apparently engage in fraud.

The company, which was founded in 1852, has already paid $185m in fines over charges that it opened more than 2m deposit and credit accounts without the permission of its customers.

And investors have knocked more than $20bn in value off Wells Fargo’s market capitalization.

When marketing automation goes wrong

Consumers love it when a company’s mask slips. They jump on perceived proof that businesses are all in it to rip off the customer.

PR snafus such as Sainsbury’s recent inside-outside poster are a good example of this phenomenon. Social media goes crazy.

In recent times, the move to enhanced service, partly stimulated by the commercial internet, means the mask has further to slip (but it still can). Companies aim to be transparent and friendly with customers on an increasing number of marketing and comms channels, but mistakes still occur.

Marketing automation is one area where brands must be vigilant, lest the wrong message be sent or the right message at the wrong time.

So, here’s a roundup of some ways in which marketing automation can go wrong, in social, ecommerce, email and advertising.

Vistaprint: too much cross-sell or just enough conversion?

Vistaprint has an interesting order and checkout process. There is lots of cross-sell and a decent amount of persuasion tactics used.

A few years ago, the website was all sorts of wrong, as Graham Charlton detailed, beaten only by GoDaddy.

Things have moved on and I must say that I don’t think it’s too complicated any more. There are a number of steps to the order process and to the checkout process but that was to be expected when designing a customised t-shirt (my chosen product).

Cross-sell and upsell is now presented on pages where I already feel assured the design process is going well.

Mainly there was a lot of clear information and some fairly persuasive copy and design techniques which I think has been judged correctly.

However, the company must be careful to keep cross-sell relevant. After being offered similar products, stationery and the like, I was then offered website builds and marketing services. This felt wrong and made me think the process might become more tiresome. If I was busier, I could have abandoned at this point.

See what you think of each stage of the order process..

This week’s finest digital marketing infographic

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for us to trawl our inboxes to pluck out the finest infographic we’ve seen this week.

This time around the winner is Monetate with a graphic that looks at traveller preferences to determine the best times during the booking process to offer upsells and cross-sells.  

For example, 45% of people who book hotels online say that they’d prefer to receive ancillary offers after choosing their hotel, but prior to booking.

Ecommerce plays a major role in allowing consumers to both research and make travel purchases, with as much as 75% of holiday planning taking place online.

New research from JiWire also shows that consumers are increasingly using mobile devices for their travel research, as 56% of consumers use their laptop to research travel options, compared to 49% on tablet and 48% on smartphone.

Is this the most hated checkout process on the web?

I wrote about the GoDaddy checkout process about a year ago, and it was one of the longest and most annoying checkouts I have seen on any e-commerce site.

There were up to ten separate steps in the process, depending on the options you select along the way, and so much cross-selling that finding a path through to the end was a real challenge. It was the very opposite of checkout best practice.  

Since I last looked, GoDaddy has made a few changes to the process, so I’ve been seeing if it is an improvement on the previous version…