crowdsourcing

Five brands using crowdsourcing for product and marketing ideas

During a recent discussion about a colleague’s obsession with Lego I was informed of the toymaker’s forays into crowdsourcing new product ideas.

This isn’t a particularly new tactic and I’ve flagged up examples of crowdsourcing in the past, but it’s a topic that’s worth revisiting as more brands get on board.

So in order to inspire your own campaigns or product development, here are five other brands using crowdsourcing…

Lego: building a customer community, brick-by-brick

Everybody loves Lego. It’s possibly the most warmly regarded brand on the planet. I can hear that unmistakable rummaging of a thousand pieces of plastic as I write this sentence. Ah, bliss.

Lego’s online strategy and how it can improve its social reach has been discussed on this blog before, and it looks as if Lego is now making huge strides in its sociability with the crowdsourcing site Lego CUUSOO.

According to Brickipedia, the brilliantly named Lego Wiki, the word cuusoo when translated loosely from Japanese means to ‘wish something into existence’. This really is the perfect way to describe Lego’s crowdsourcing initiative. 

Eight brands that crowdsourced marketing and product ideas

Nissan has just announced a new marketing campaign that uses its social channels to allow fans to help customise and name a one-off version of the Juke Nismo.

The campaign, which is fronted by ex-F1 driver Johnny Herbert, asks fans to contribute ideas for the kind of technology that should be incorporated into the car using the hashtag #Jukeride.

The idea is to use digital technology to help Nissan’s professional driver’s improve their skills, while also allowing the brand’s social community to get involved with the development process.

A key part of the campaign involves a companion remote control helicopter that takes off from the roof of the car and tracks the driver’s performance while also providing unique footage of motorsports events.