Daily Mail

How The Guardian became the most tweeted UK newspaper

Stories from The Guardian are tweeted on average 392,358 times per week making it the most popular newspaper in the UK on Twitter.

This is followed by The Daily Telegraph (307,690 tweets) in second place and the Daily Mail (237,381 tweets) in third, meaning that the Daily Mail’s content is 92,000 tweets less popular than The Guardian’s.

Us Vs Th3m: shareable content beats traditional SEO

Or how Us Vs Th3m earned loads of links by ignoring traditional search marketing…

Us Vs Th3m is essentially a Tumblr site with a wry eye on popular culture in the digital world. Think Buzzfeed but way more cynical.

If you haven’t heard of the site by name, chances are you’ll be aware of and have probably played certain games that regularly dominate Facebook for an intense period of time. ‘How much are you hated by the Daily Mail?’ and ‘What’s the theme tune of your life?’ for example.

Us Vs Th3m has made hundreds of those types of games and almost all of them have been massive viral smashes. In fact Us Vs Them is quite notable for only being one year old and yet regularly and consistently dominating social media and search engine results pages.

The site may be owned by the Trinity Mirror group, which also publishes the Daily Mirror, People and 240 regional newspapers around the UK making it the country’s biggest newspaper group, but it doesn’t rely on its parent company to do its heavy lifting for it.

It merely has to rely on you and the rest of your friends on Facebook.

I attended BrightonSEO last week and listened to the keynote speech from Trinity Mirror’s product director Malcolm Coles, who had the following to say about the success of Us Vs Th3m’s social and content strategy.

Are there any serious lessons to be learnt from Mail Online’s content strategy?

Despite its reputation, Mail Online is the world’s most popular online newspaper, which must also make it the world’s ultimate guilty pleasure.

Often those who visit the site are dubious about the news value, yet the images of half-dressed celebs and salacious gossip keep them coming back for more.

The Mail has perhaps been forced to adopt this model as it needs to chase pageviews above all else in order to maximise its ad revenue.

The only other realistic option is to duck behind a paywall, but it’s not difficult to find celebrity gossip elsewhere on the internet, so it’s doubtful that this would be a profitable strategy.

But is the Mail’s enduring popularity something that brand marketers can learn from?

I took a look at its content strategy to find out…