data-driven marketing

5-key-skills

Five novel ways marketers are harnessing technology to improve results

Technology has been an essential part of the marketing toolkit for decades.

How marketers use technology to achieve their objectives, though, is constantly changing. As new channels emerge and consumers develop new behaviors, brands have to change how they harness data, computing power and analytics to keep current.

Six ways CROs botch their statistics

Conversion rate optimizers (CROs) are part design professional, part marketing strategist, and part scientist. To be successful, they need to be highly proficient across several disciplines.

For that reason, it shouldn’t be surprising that CROs are rarely full experts in any of the three disciplines. They either specialize in one or focus on how the disciplines fit together as a cohesive whole.

What now for data-driven marketing?

In a late-2017 Econsultancy survey, one in six brand marketers stated that “data-driven marketing that focuses on the individual” was “the single most exciting opportunity” for their organisation.

Following the Cambridge Analytica/Facebook scandal, though, things have changed. Concerns about public sentiment now override maximizing the use of consumer data, leaving data-driven marketing with an uncertain future.

Marketing in the Dark: How organisations are dealing with dark data

According to research, 80% of all the data a company possesses is dark data – i.e. the unstructured and unanalysed data gathered from multiple operations and channels, including the social web, customer service, raw surveys, and more.

This finding comes from Econsultancy’s Marketing in the Dark report in association with IBM, which is based on an extensive survey of more than 1,000 marketers.

Four steps to optimizing customer experience using data & analytics

Few would argue that two of the most important marketing topics at the moment are customer experience (CX) and data analytics.

Which is interesting as CX and analytics seem worlds apart. CX tends to be a soft, holistic study of how to make customers happier and analytics consists of the cold, hard numbers which fuel return on investment (ROI) calculations.