data privacy

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): what we know & what’s coming next

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – an EU-wide overhaul of consumer data laws aimed at strengthening the protection of people’s data privacy – was announced at the tail end of 2015.  

The new laws won’t be finalised until later this year, and won’t take effect for another two years after that.

But in a talk I attended at Data Protection 2016 on Friday, two leading government figures did their best to tell the audience what to expect and explain why the reform is happening. 

The five-point plan for data privacy & business

On Friday I attended a talk at Data Protection 2016 that was all about – you guessed it – data, but specifically how businesses can continue to thrive in the ever-evolving data economy.   

The talk from Ctrl-Shift CEO Liz Brandt covered five key action points that business and government need to tackle together in order to avert a future crisis.

I’m going to cover them in detail in this post.  

Three’s a crowd: how first-party data builds customer relationships

Three’s a crowd, and I’m not referring to failed 80s sitcoms. I’m talking about customer relationships.

Yet according to a study by the UC Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, 85% of the top 1,000 websites have cookies set by a third party.

Propelled by widespread anonymity in the early days of the Internet, third-party cookies have undoubtedly become a staple for many marketers, tracking consumer behaviors across the web with the promise of uncovering invaluable insights.

Not only is this an invasion of consumer privacy (more on that later), but it also prevents businesses from truly knowing and understanding their customers.

First-party data, transparently collected via voluntary user registration, on-site activities and interactions, removes data brokers as middlemen, establishing direct brand and consumer connections and fostering 1:1 relationships.

Let’s take a look at three ways that third-party cookies are hurting your customer relationships, and how first-party data can be collected and used to improve audience understanding and user experiences.

Spotlight on data privacy: three steps to building consumer trust

Consumer concern about data privacy has shifted over the past decade.

More than ten years ago, consumers were concerned when companies such as Amazon analyzed their data to provide them with a recommended list of products they may be interested in based on their purchase habits.

Fast forwarding to today, many consumers now expect companies to mine their data through the use of analytics to provide them with relevant offers and products to improve their shopping experience.

Yet, recent data breaches have placed a spotlight on data privacy once again, moving the topic of consumer personalization versus privacy back to the forefront of the marketing conversation.