data

The GDPR claims its first victims

The GDPR goes into effect later this month and GDPR compliance efforts are well underway. For example, users of online services around the world are receiving notifications of updated terms of service and privacy policies.

Some of the updates contained in these agreements are significant. Facebook-owned WhatsApp, for instance, has increased its minimum age to 16. Snapchat isn’t abandoning users under 16, but it is changing how some of its features work for its under-16 userbase.

Companies around the world are worried about the GDPR: study

The GDPR is coming and even though it is an EU law, it will have a profound impact on businesses around the world, even those that don’t have a physical presence in the EU.

That’s because the GDPR’s protections apply to all individuals within the Union and non-EU companies that control or process data from individuals in EU are expected to register a representative and comply with the law. Those that don’t face stiff penalties, including fines of up to €20 million or 4% of global annual turnover.

Marketing in the Dark: How organisations are dealing with dark data

According to research, 80% of all the data a company possesses is dark data – i.e. the unstructured and unanalysed data gathered from multiple operations and channels, including the social web, customer service, raw surveys, and more.

This finding comes from Econsultancy’s Marketing in the Dark report in association with IBM, which is based on an extensive survey of more than 1,000 marketers.

How to get the most out of audience data in programmatic

One of the great advantages of programmatic is access to audience data.

On top of the first-party data a business might hold, there is an enormous supply of third-party data that can be added to enhance targeting. Despite this, a CIM report this year found that 50% of all marketing is deemed ‘irrelevant’ by the audience it reaches.