demographics

Web design across different generations

For a website or digital product to be truly ‘user-centric’, we need to determine who the ‘user’ is.

Each person will approach a website, system or app through their own, unique mental model, applying how they think it will be organised to each new one they encounter. 

Although each individual’s mental model is unique, users can be ‘grouped’ to determine their digital (dis)abilities.

Generations share key aspects of their mental models, as people who live in the same period are influenced by societal values and culture, the emergence of new technologies, and experience similar events to some degree.

Similarly, they share age-related elements, such as physical or cognitive (dis)abilities. 

Demographic shifts: a social media marketer’s worst nightmare?

For digital marketers, understanding the audience a platform offers access to is crucial. After all, if you don’t know who you will be reaching, it’s all but impossible to craft messages and experiences that resonate.

The good news: digital channels are generally understood far better than their offline counterparts because users can be tracked far more comprehensively and accurately. The bad news: the make-up of digital channels can change, and sometimes quite rapidly. This is particularly true in social channels, where what’s hot today is not hot tomorrow.

Buoyed by smart phones and tablets, daily online usage jumps: report

If you work in a digital industry, the ubiquity of the internet is practically taken for granted. But that doesn’t mean that the percentage of consumers accessing the internet on a regular basis isn’t impressive. And it doesn’t mean that percentage isn’t growing.

In fact, according to Forrester Research, the number of adults in the United States who access the internet on a daily basis is growing more than one might imagine.

Five key considerations for brands considering new social sites

To join or not to join. When it comes to new social sites, that is the question brands must ask themselves.

While social networks like Facebook and Twitter continue to be dominant, services like Pinterest and Instagram are attracting more and more individuals. Even Google’s social network, Google+, which many were skeptical about, has managed to grow into a respectable channel with more than 100m active monthly users.

Is Google+ facing a demographic fail?

If the future of the internet is social, as some believe, the long-term fate of the world’s largest search engine could rest on how well its social network, Google+ does.

While it has a long way to go before it catches up to Facebook in popularity and adoption, with over 100m users, it would appear that Google is off to a decent start.

Tablets are from Mars, e-readers are from Venus

Whether you’re male or female, there’s an almost equal chance that you own a smartphone. But what about tablets and e-readers? Do men and women share different preferences when it comes to the latest and greatest mobile devices?

According to
Nielsen’s latest survey of mobile device owners, the answer is
increasingly ‘yes.’ In Q2 2011, it found that 61% of e-readers were
owned by women, up from 46% in the third quarter of 2010. Tablets?
Almost the opposite: 57% of them are owned by men.

Android’s problem: stingy users?

The success of Android in the mobile market may be one of Google’s biggest accomplishments outside of search, and it may be crucial to the company’s long-term success generally.

But when it comes to ecosystems, Android still lags well behind Apple, which has built the mother of all ecosystems around iOS.

The question for Google: why is that?

Demographics aren’t dead

Are demographics dead? Will marketers eventually buy most if not all media inventory, including television inventory, on performance-based models instead?

Executives from agency Initiative think so.