desktop

Are marketers overestimating mobile search?

Every month Google delivers results for about 50bn mobile searches, and in May the search giant revealed that mobile devices produce more searches than their desktop cousins in 10 countries, including the US and Japan.

So it’s no surprise that marketers are paying a lot of attention to mobile search, from ensuring that their sites live up to Google’s mobile-friendliness standards to pouring money into mobile paid search.

comScore: the desktop is far from dead

Thanks to the proliferation of smart phones, mobile has seemingly taken over the web, forcing companies to build mobile-friendly experiences, or else.

But that doesn’t mean that the desktop is dead. 

Smartphones, tablets or TV: How do we consume media in 2014?

How do we consume media in 2014? And what media? And on which devices?

Ofcom released The Communications Market Report in August 2014 and it’s chock full of interesting data and charts on the UK market.

I’ve previously looked at mobile and tablet usage. Now I’m turning by attention to the broader topic of media uptake, in its various forms.

For more statistical goodness, download our Internet Statistics Compendium

Mobile and desktop traffic: neck and neck?

Mobile is now more important than desktop (I posit). You only have to look at Google’s recent changes to see that change is irrevocably afoot. 

Tom Loosemore, Deputy Director at GDS, pondered yesterday whether a significant landmark, mobile devices bringing more traffic than laptops and PCs, is near.

There’s some great stuff in his blog and I thought I’d have a look around to find some additional evidence and perhaps even make the bold claim that mobile traffic is already in the majority!

See what you think and I’d love you to add some stats from your own site to the comments below, allowing us to make a more reasoned evaluation still.

Does Hyatt provide a five star digital experience?

Hyatt releases its Q3 results today, so I thought I’d pre-empt the webcast and take a look at the company’s digital efforts.

Is its digital marketing as good as the hotels? And how do its efforts compare to some big name competition?

It turns out Hyatt is fairly solid, online. I didn’t get mad trying to use the website, and everything was easy to find, with a good mobile presence.

To take it to the next level, Hyatt would have to redesign its website to match the modern design of RoomKey or Top10.com.

It would also be great to see more rich content on the Hyatt website, rather than simply its social channels. This would allow more of the atmosphere of the hotels and the ethos of the brand to suffuse the browsing and booking process.

Let’s have a look at the brand’s paid, owned and earned digital content.

Gatwick Airport’s responsive website has landed, and it’s pretty sexy

We were alerted to the Gatwick Airport website redesign by Matt Wilkinson, Senior Ecommerce Manager at Gatwick, in the comments on this responsive design round-up.

With responsive design riding a tidal wave of popularity and common sense, I can’t think of a sector better suited than air travel.

We’ve all been travelling to an airport, needing to check flight times, terminals, parking arrangements, delays etc. We know airport websites have this info, but we aren’t confident in navigating an old desktop site from our phones. Well, it seems Gatwick have smashed it out the park on this one.

This post isn’t going to go into too much detail about why the site is great. I’ll just post some annotated pictures of it, and encourage you to try it out for yourself.

The smartphone and the customer journey: a Google perspective

Google has a unique viewpoint from which to look at mobile’s part to play in the customer journey.

SERPs, AdWords, Google Maps, Google Chrome, Google accounts – all have a part to play. And perhaps soon Google Wallet and Google Glass.

I attended Latitude’s client summit last week and listened to Harry Davies, Lead Product Marketing Manager, Large Customer Marketing, at Google (helping customers get the most from search).

I’ve tried to sum up some of what Harry had to say, giving an overview of mobile’s involvement in retail in 2013.

Smartphones achieve highest paid search CTR: report

Mobile devices achieve higher click-through rates than desktops when it comes to UK paid search ads, according to a report from Marin Software.

The data looks at how different devices performed during 2012, with smartphones achieving the highest CTR at 5.87%, compared to 3.93% on tablet and 2.29% on desktop.

And though the same is true of the Eurozone, the difference is less pronounced – smartphones achieved a CTR of 4.78%, compared to 4.48% on tablet and 3.1% on desktop.

The findings come from Marin’s new report that looks at how smartphones and tablets are changing paid search.

Five harmful mobile myths

As mobile’s prominence has grown, so too have the myths about what it takes to create and execute on a successful mobile strategy.

Given the size of the mobile opportunity, the size of the challenges and the speed with which mobile ecosystems are evolving, it’s not surprising that many of these myths are accepted at face value. Unfortunately for companies trying to make mobile progress, some of these myths are detrimental.

Can Ubuntu finally give Windows a run for its money?

Microsoft isn’t exactly the most-loved company in the world, and part of that arguably has to do with its dominant position in the OS market. Its flagship product, Windows, has improved recently, but frustrations caused by its checkered past are, for some, hard to forget.

For years, many computer industry professionals have hoped that strong Windows alternatives would emerge. Much of this hope was based on the idea that highly-polished GUIs for Linux-based operating systems could offer consumers Windows-like experiences and give Microsoft a run for its money.