Digg

The seven major problems with the new Digg

News aggregator Digg relaunched last week with a new ad-free design that puts more emphasis on big images to lure in readers.

It is a big step away from its previous design that displayed all links in the same way, and now looks more akin to a curated news site, as opposed to an aggregator.

The way stories reach the homepage has also been changed – it no longer relies on diggs from regular users and instead takes into account shares on Facebook and Twitter as well as employing editors to curate the content.

For old users or those familiar with the previous site the new version is almost unrecognisable, so it seems Digg’s new owners have realised that the old way didn’t work and are pitching for a whole new audience.

But in the short term most of its traffic is going to be from previous users who want to see how the new site works. 

Five lessons learned from Digg’s rise and fall

Social news site Digg was once one of the most popular services on the internet. An early social media darling, Digg and its founder, Kevin Rose, were the subject of numerous high-profile articles, including an embarrassing (and not-entirely-accurate) BusinessWeek cover piece with the headline How This Kid Made $60 Million In 18 Months.

It wasn’t just the media lavishing attention on Digg: investors poured big money — some $45m in total — into the company. 

But what goes up often comes down and as it turned out for Digg, the company’s future was not going to be nearly as bright as its early years. Yesterday, the company’s assets, including the code for the Digg site itself and its domain, were sold to New York-based development firm Betaworks for a reported $500,000.

Can this man save Google’s social strategy?

How important is social to Google’s future?

It depends on who you ask. Some believe that if Google doesn’t find a way to compete in the space, Facebook might eventually eat its lunch.

Those who are a tad more skeptical suggest that Google and its advertising money machine don’t need social to thrive.

Time will tell which camp is right, but Google has already decided. With the launch of Google+ and Search, plus Your World, it’s clear that the search giant is committed to giving its all in an effort to become a meaningful player in the social market.

StumbleUpon brings the iFrame back

You thought they were gone. Those pesky, annoying, experience-destroying things. Yes, I’m talking about iFrames.

Popular a decade ago, they’ve made a few appearances in the past several years. The once-popular Digg, for instance, turned to them to implement its DiggBar.

But now they’re back.