eBay

Close-up of a smartphone held in front of a desktop computer with the Ebay logo displayed on its screen.

Why have an eBay strategy in 2021?

In this article, I’ll take a look at eBay in 2021: its size, the markets where it is popular, and what types of products sell best on the platform. I’ll also look at eBay’s offerings for businesses and how brands can benefit from a presence on the site, as well as tips for how to optimise that presence, drawing on material from Econsultancy’s recently-published Third-Party Marketplaces Best Practice Guide.

What brands should consider when selling on eBay

In the second quarter of 2018, eBay reached 172 million active users. 

While this figure sounds paltry compared to Amazon’s 310 million, it’s interesting to note that the average visit duration on eBay is reportedly 50% longer than on Amazon.

Ebay becomes latest ecommerce brand to offer visual search

Ecommerce pioneer eBay doesn’t make headlines nearly as often as peers like Amazon, which appears well on its way to taking over the world, but that doesn’t mean that eBay isn’t trying to rekindle growth through innovation.

Case in point: on Wednesday, the company, which had already applied visual search to its Motors app, announced broad new image recognition features for its mobile apps which allow users to “use pictures instead of words to search eBay’s 1.1 billion listings.”

Which retailer has the best Black Friday strategy?

2015 has seen retailers continue to evolve their Black Friday strategies, with many spreading sales across the period.

UK retailers, in particular, have learnt from last year’s bumper day (a breakthrough for the holiday in the UK) and either dropped out from the race or tried to spread demand.

Let’s have a look at the strategies being adopted by a number of major retailers.

eBay’s focus on UX pays off: mobile app review

To mark its 20th anniversary, eBay has launched a brand new version of its mobile app for Android and Apple. 

eBay claims the new design provides an improved shopping experience and that browsing and buying items is now much easier. I thought I’d check it out and see for myself.

How eBay uses social media: Tumblr, Twitter and Instagram

Or… what is the point of following eBay on any social channel?

That’s basically the question I asked myself when I sat down to write this primarily speculative post. I can’t imagine ever feeling the need to ‘follow’ eBay, despite being a long-term user of its online marketplace.

Q&A: eBay on mobile commerce and innovation

EBay invested heavily in mobile from very early on, and its sales now reflect the value of this strategy. 

Almost half of eBay’s transactions globally are now touched by mobile at some point in the transaction, whether people research or buy on moble. 

I’ve been speaking to Jonathan Gabbai, Head of International Mobile at eBay about its mobile strategy…

paypal payment

PayPal and eBay split up. Now what?

In case you haven’t heard, online giants eBay and PayPal decided to part ways and become independent companies.

eBay will become eBay Marketplace, and PayPal will simply exist without eBay’s affiliation. The news comes as no surprise to many, since the ecommerce world has witnessed new, intimidating entrants such as Twitter and Facebook over the past few months.

How to increase conversions by creating buyer urgency & fear of loss

A sense of urgency and fear of loss are powerful sales drivers in ecommerce.

Undecided shoppers can be encouraged to make an impulse purchase if they think they’re in direct competition with other people for a product that has limited availability.

I recently rounded up 11 examples from ecommerce sites that use stock levels to create buyer urgency, but that’s by no means the only tactic available.

Here is a range of other techniques used by well known brands that can prove to be very effective in driving conversions.

And just to clarify, I’ve intentionally avoided group discount and flash sale sites (e.g. Groupon) that are built around scarcity and deadlines.

Brand pages on online marketplaces: A good idea, badly executed

If you were wise enough to setup an online marketplace in the early days of the internet and also had great business chops, you might have been a very rich person by now.

Some of the world’s biggest ecommerce companies are those that don’t actually sell any of their own products, or rely to a large extent on third-party sellers.

Amazon is the most obvious example, while eBay has also taken great pains to rebrand as a marketplace rather than an auction site (try saying that eBay is an auction site in a blog post and see how long it takes for the PRs to knock on your door).

Similarly, in the UK Play.com shifted from being an ecommerce site to an “online trading platform” after being bought out by Rakuten, a Japanese tech company that is best known for its Rakuten Ichiba marketplace.

Ebay extends click and collect service to 650 Argos stores

Ebay has announced plans to expand its click & collect service with Argos to more than 65,000 sellers by the end of this year.

Following an “incredibly popular” trial period involving 50 eBay sellers and 150 Argos stores, click & collect will now be a delivery option from ‘eligible sellers’ at around 650 Argos stores.

By the end of 2015 eBay plans to extend the scheme to include 80,000 sellers.

The deal has a number of benefits for eBay, not least that it extends the brand’s presence on the high street following its experiments with Christmas pop-up shops in the centre of London.

Furthermore, Argos’ own click & collect service has already proven to be hugely popular among shoppers. The company’s 2014 Operational Review reported that ‘Check & Reserve’ now accounts for 31% of total sales.