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15+ of the worst things to happen to the internet in 2013

Because it can’t all be sunshine, lollipops, rainbows and Google Hummingbirds.

We at Econsultancy consider ourselves as promoters of best practice. ‘Achieve Digital Excellence’ reads our brand new strapline in the big red dot up there, and with this modus operandi we carry a great responsibility.

The responsibility of wading through the darkest digital waters (confusing and potentially dangerous metaphor alert) and remaining constantly poised to spear the very best of the internet. We do so in order to bring you the most considered insight, through research, practice, good old fashioned investigation and occasionally asking Twitter for help.

Of course for every tasty salmon we catch, we also have a net-full of bottom feeding suction eels too. We don’t really know what to do with them and they’re piling up around the floor of the boat.

So let us unburden our unpleasant haul upon you, with this round-up of the worst things to happen to the internet in 2013:

Top 20 most shared video ads of 2013

It’s late November, so we’re comfortably past the point where people are no longer agitated that ‘best of the year’ lists are starting to appear already.

In fact I’ve already got my ‘Best Korean Pop Albums’ and ‘Favourite Men’s Health Straplines (abs category)’ lists all lined up and ready to go. In a listicle heavy year, this Winter will be the ultimate in year-end countdown meltdown, or Listageddon as I’m pushing for the late November period to be renamed.

Hot off the presses today (I’m sure there’s a more up-to-date cliche then that) and towering above the rest is Unruly with its Top 20 most shared ads of 2013.

This one’s good because it’s based on fact, not the opinion of some feckless pundit.

YouTube strategy for brands: 10 of the best

Only 74 of the top 5,000 YouTube channels are from brands.

This research comes from Touchstorm’s latest study, The Touchstorm Video Index, covering Q3 2013 and concentrating on the ‘YouTube 5,000’, an elite group of channels with at least 43m views each.

Of those 5,000 channels, only 2% are owned by brands. That means there are 4,926 teenagers with webcams, older people with camcorders, vloggers with flipcams, bedroom animators with smartphones and various other fashionistas, musicians, close-up magicians, action figure critics and amateur film-makers who are completely dominating the platform and squeezing out the big companies.

What can brands do about this? Is there any hope for them?

Here are some key findings from the report, along with our own insight, ideas for strategy and a look at the brands who are using YouTube successfully.