experience

How museums are using immersive digital experiences

It is common knowledge that many art galleries and museums are finding it tough to market to younger, digitally-oriented generations.

Although millennials ‘enjoy museums’, they have also ‘expressed concern that the content and mission of many museums may not be in sync with millennials’ interest and values’, according to millennialmarketing.com.

New Year marketing resolutions you shouldn’t break in 2014

It’s February and already, according to a number of statistical sources, around a quarter of us have failed to uphold our New Year’s resolutions.

Interestingly, 39% of people in their twenties achieve their resolution each year compared to only 14% of people over 50. That’s interesting given the prevailing attitudes towards younger generations.

In the same vein, marketers are mapping out the conversations they want to have this year to stay ahead of the curve. Given the influx of ‘2014 Trends’ in January, I thought it would be a useful point to review the best and highlight a few that might follow New Year’s resolutions.

Mobile marketing lessons from the Nest Labs success story

Nest Labs meteoric rise to $3.2bn acquisition by Google in three years has been powered by three principles you can apply to your mobile marketing.

Nest Labs is a Silicon Valley based disruptor dedicated to ‘transforming people’s lives’ with connected devices for the home that are both rational and emotional.

Founded by Tony Faddell, ex-Apple iPod lead inventor, Nest has been acquired by Google for $3.2bn. It has launched two products to date: the Next Learning thermostat and Nest Protect smoke alarm.

The smoke detector has to be one of the most ugly, unloved, annoying (but important) household devices we have around us. And Nest reinvented it…

The Nest Protect is a smart smoke detector and the principles of its design, user interface and concept speaks to three key best practices in Mobile development.

It’s a case study in considered care and empathy. They’ve produced a wonderful, differentiated product in a commoditized market that justifies its price premium.

Now is the time to embrace showrooming

A new TNS study across 43 countries suggests that 21% of shoppers use smartphones in store to ‘showroom’, 43% read reviews, 31% compare prices and 25% seek advice before they buy from friends and family.  

This phenomenon has put the fear of God into many within the retail industry, woken businesses up to the link between the high street and internet and made retailers aware that they are not ready to service this reality.

We’ve seen Jessops and HMV go into administration in recent months and Best Buy shrink. The culprit? Supposedly showrooming.

From user coercion to customer immersion

Selling has become tougher. Consumers are more sophisticated and competition more aggressive. We now use multiple touch points and we’ve become immune to age-old models of closing.



In this new age of cynicism, how can marketers cut through and deliver more valuable, immersive experiences and what research techniques should underpin these?

Consider this, just 5% of the brain represents what we consciously process and traditional market research can access. What we subconsciously process accounts for the remaining 95%.   

So, if our subconscious is smarter and faster than our conscious mind, why doesn’t more of today’s user experience and communications planning seek to tap into subconscious emotions?

Q&A: Kevin Cochrane of Adobe on customer experience management

Kevin CochraneAdobe launched its Digital Enterprise Platform last week as part of its goal of providing companies with a full suite of customer experience management (CEM) products in a multichannel age. 

We have interviewed Kevin Cochrane, Adobe’s vice president of enterprise marketing, who talks about the increased focus on customer experience across a range of business sectors and explains why technology is only part of the equation.  

Should you trust a startup?

If you run a business that’s active online, or are involved in digital marketing in any way, chances are you’ve done business with a startup before.

No big deal, right? After all, today’s hot startup could be tomorrow’s Apple or Google, and even if it isn’t, there’s no denying that startups are a driving force behind innovation.

But should you always trust a startup? Are there times when joining forces with one is a bad idea?

Poor online experience costing business billions

Reducing Customer StruggleCompanies are losing out on billions of dollars and pounds in revenue due to a poor online experience, according to research published today by Econsultancy and Tealeaf. A global survey of more than 500 businesses for the Reducing Customer Struggle report found that companies able to quantify site abandonment estimate they are losing the equivalent of 24% of their annual online revenue due to a bad website experience. 

The real problem with magazine iPad apps

Prior to the launch of the iPad, many magazine publishers hoped that the
iPad might do for them what the iPod and iTunes did for digital music:
provided a viable marketplace for them to sell their wares. Operative
word: sell.

Getting consumers to pay for content has, of course, proven challenging
for many magazine publishers. And despite the warm reception the iPad
has received from consumers, it hasn’t exactly meant overnight success
for publishers that have rushed to develop iPad versions of their
magazines.