failure

How to fail the right way: seven tips

The fact that more and more companies are coming to accept and embrace the f-word — failure — is arguably a good thing. After all, for many organizations, fear of failure has been an impediment to progress and innovation.

But the fact that an epic fail here and there can lead to success shouldn’t delude business owners and executives into believing that all failure is created equal. To get the most out of fail, a company must fail properly.

In the cloud, when it rains FAIL, it pours

If one trend has captured the hearts and minds of internet executives, entrepreneurs and developers alike over the past several years, it’s cloud computing. And when it comes to market leaders, at the front of the pack is Amazon.

Its suite of offerings, known as Amazon Web Services (AWS), has attracted some of the most prominent consumer internet services, including Twitter, as well as a slew of up-and-coming startups looking for the ability to scale in their early days without Facebook-like funding. Through its cloud, companies can do everything from run resource-intensive applications to send high volumes of email.

#fail is underrated

For most of us, failure is something to be avoided. After all, who really likes attempting to accomplish something and not succeeding?

But there’s an inconvenient truth: failure is underrated. In many cases, it’s a prerequisite for success and those who embrace it and learn from it have a strategic advantage over those who won’t and can’t.

How not to be the GM of your industry

Yesterday, United States President Barack Obama told American automaker GM what most of us have known for at least the past several months: right now, the beleaguered automaker is in no shape to stay in business.

GM’s CEO Rick Wagoner stepped down at the request of the Obama administration and the company has little time to prove to the US government that it can right the ship or it will not be given the additional government aid it can’t survive without.