fake followers

Unilever gets serious about influencer fraud

For years, brands have continued to up their spend on influencer marketing despite risks such as fraud and scandal and, arguably, they have had good reason to do so.

After all, consumers, particularly young consumers, are often most easily reached via social media, where they’ve embraced and made stars of a new generation of celebrities.

The fake follower economy is beginning to crumble

For years, there has existed an underground market in which individuals and companies buy and sell fake social media followers, along with fake likes and comments. 

These markets are an open secret and while fake accounts obviously violate the rules of popular social platforms like Facebook and Twitter, they have persisted.

15% of social media reviews will be fake by 2014: report

The Beatles once sang, “All you need is love” and thanks to the rise of social media, it’s not just humans looking for it. Brands, once largely relegated to communicating with consumers through one-way mediums like television and radio, have flocked to services like Facebook and Twitter in search of long-term relationships.

If the millions of ‘Likes’ and followers some of them have attracted are any indication, social media could be the foundation of a happy marriage between brands and consumers. But under the surface, this relationship may not be as solid as it appears.

According to Gartner, brands are increasingly turning to paying for positive reviews, ‘Likes’ and followers on popular social networking sites and by 2014, the research firm estimates that over one in ten of these will be fake.

Are your Twitter followers fake, or just quiet?

Twitter’s battle with spammers is well-documented, and not surprisingly, one of the tools that makes Twitter spam possible is the fake account.

While the exact number of fake accounts is hard to accurately estimate, there’s little doubt they exist, and most likely in big numbers.