followers

How to get started with Twitter analytics

Twitter rolled out its built-in analytics to all users fairly recently.

If you’re an advertiser with Twitter, you’ll have had access to Twitter analytics for a while, but for everyone just hopping on board, I thought it would be useful to take a spin through the various features and look at the insights you can (and can’t) glean from them. 

Your social media initiatives might be pointless if…

Social media, as a channel, is hard to hate, and despite the fact that companies are still grappling with ROI, brands continue to pour larger and larger sums into social media initiatives and industry observers continue to show the same interest in highlighting and analyzing them as they did when social media first started to go mainstream.

But don’t let any of this fool you. Investment and attention don’t mean that social media initiatives are effective, or serve a useful purpose. In fact, many of them are arguably downright pointless.

How to identify Twitter churn

https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0002/8295/goodbye-note-blog-thumb.jpgNot all Twitter followers are created equal. 

Chasing large numbers for their own sake is a very dangerous game that a lot of brands still fall into, but unless you’re doing customer service there’s often no real point in following back everyone who follows you.

That isn’t to say that there’s no value in a large audience. Having a thousand people who really do like your brand and who talk about you has all sorts of benefits, from increasing lead potential to good old fashioned brand lift. Buzz really does count in many cases. 

With this in mind, how do you sort the wheat from the chaff, and how do you make sure your important followers stick with you? I’ve been looking into the levels of churn on our own accounts recently, and thought it would be worth sharing my findings and start thinking about ways to address this…  

Twitter co-founder reveals his dream metric

For brand marketers looking to figure out whether or not their Twitter investments are paying off, metrics are a big challenge.

Arguably the most prominent Twitter metric, followers, is of limited use in practice, particularly since it’s so easy to game. Other metrics, such as retweets, may be slightly more meaningful, but they’re often difficult to connect to the most important business KPIs as well.

How @Econsultancy got 100,000 Twitter followers [Infographic]

https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0002/0262/100000_logo-blog-thumb.pngWe’re not generally ones to blow our own trumpets here at Econsultancy, but last week our main Twitter account (@Econsultancy, feel free to follow us!) sailed past the 100,000 followers mark.

That’s quite a milestone in anyone’s books, so I decided to take a closer look at our followers, who they are and what they do (and of course, what they’re worth… ).

It turns out, there are a LOT of facts and figures flying around that are fascinating to look at, and what better way to compile them than in that most tweet-worthy way: An infographic.

We’d also like to say thanks to everyone there for helping us get to this point, we’ve learned a huge amount about every aspect of our business thanks to your feedback and had a great time along the way. 

Anyway, enough gushing, check out the stats! 

Twitter Gate lets companies screen their followers

On Twitter, common wisdom is that more is better, particularly when it comes to followers. After all, who doesn’t want more followers?

But what if, for instance, you’re an alcohol brand that wants or needs to restrict your marketing messages to consumers above a certain age? A site like Twitter, on which anyone can follow you unless you’ve made your account private, becomes a tricky platform on which to build an effective presence.

10 sure fire ways brands can annoy fans and followers

When you work with brands using channels like Facebook and Twitter on a daily basis, you become very familiar with some of the pitfalls companies can fall into – and what results they seem to generate.

I’ve never been one of those people who likes to kick-up a stink when a brand makes a mistake but I like to keep a close eye on what trends seem to annoy customers most, if only to learn from them for the future.

As well as my own experience, I decided to do a bit of amateur research this week. I asked people to reveal what they find most annoying about brand behaviour on social media platforms, with a particular focus on Facebook and Twitter. Below is the culmination of that research.

How to find a social media influencer

social-media-influencerWhen you’re embarking on a social media campaign, one of the most
important goals is finding influencers. If you can get respected and well known market voices behind, then you can give your campaign an
invaluable leg-up.

The only problem here of course, is that influencers
themselves are elusive figures. How are you going to hunt them down, and do
you even know where to start looking?

In order to do so, we need to
clearly define influence…