fonts

Can a pay-what-you-want type foundry work?

Typography is a huge but often overlooked and underestimated component of effective design, particularly on the web.

Fonts are often sold through foundries, which are sort of like the record labels of the typography world. While many produce their own fonts for sale, they also serve as distributors for independent designers and studios, earning a royalty each time they sell a font.

Will snazzy web fonts soon be a reality?

It’s somewhat amazing to think that despite the technological
advancement seen on the web over the past decade, web designers are
still pretty much relegated to using a relatively small group of web
safe fonts when designing websites.

While it’s easy to forget about the role fonts play in creating a
compelling aesthetic, any decent print designer, for instance, knows
just how important they can be.

26 inspiring resources for typography junkies

As a boy I used to love two types of shops: toy stores, especially those with vast stocks of Lego, and stationery retailers, in which I could lose myself for hours. The latter remains a weird affliction that I don’t yet know the name for.

While I’m not a designer by trade I’ve always loved a good font and appreciate great typography. In an online environment it is often the difference between a good site and a great site, since it is a major part of a website’s visual appeal.

Some say that web design is 95% typography. I’m not sure I’d go quite that far, but I do believe that it can help improve the user experience, that it can help persuade visitors to interact and take action, and that as such you should ask yourself whether your site needs a makeover in this department?

I’ve been working on a new website and have done a lot of research in this area. It is so hard to get wrong, and I’m not yet sure that I’ll get it right, but I’ve collated this list from a bunch of my recent bookmarks and thought it would be a good idea to aggregate and share them.