France

Hollande and Sarkozy: How not to use social media in politics or business

On May 7, 2012, François Hollande took over from Nicolas Sarkozy as President of France.  If, for many, the final vote was read as an indictment against Sarkozy, more than a vote for Hollande, both candidates outdid themselves equally in one area: they were both equally inept at handling the social media opportunity.  

As we reflect on the Obama-Romney duel, one can observe that social media and politics are inextricably linked.  While social media has had a well-noted impact in the Arab Spring and, increasingly, in deeply controlled countries such as Saudi Arabia and China, the relationship has even more impact in a democratic forum, where openness and liberty of expression are enabled, along with the potential for anonymity. 

France’s ‘three strikes’ piracy law hasn’t helped music or movie sales

What’s the best way to stamp out piracy? In France, the entertainment industry was successful in pushing a ‘three strikes’ law that would boot serial infringers from the web.

That went into effect in October 2010. So how’s it doing?

According to HADOPI, the agency tasked with administering and enforcing the law of the same name, things are going just great. 

A report it released, which looked at data for the 17-month period following the law’s implementation, claims that “illegal downloading [is] clearly on the decline in France.”