General Motors

Chris Brogan: Be helpful, be brief, and listen

Chris Brogan has probably done it all in his 12 years in the digital space of online networks and social communities.

Now a best selling author, his latest book Google+ for Business tries to help businesses understand how Google+ offers tangible opportunities that aren’t available anywhere else.

I had a chance to meet Chris in person a couple weeks ago at Blogworld. Normally I’d cut down my interview and weed out the additional exchanges, but because I enjoyed the interview so much I left the whole conversation in.

Twitter showdown: Ford vs General Motors

As the newest Fortune 500 list came out this morning, we’ve pulled two of the top 10 to be today’s competitors in our Twitter showdown: General Motors (ranking 5th on the list) and Ford (who came in 9th). 

Everyone knows how passionate people are about their cars but will their standings on the Fortune 500 reflect how they are doing in the social space? Let’s find out.

Why do people love Instagram? Looking at GM and Apple in order to understand the appeal of altered photos

Apple’s products contrast sharply with the mid-century General Motors cars that brought the jet-age into people’s garages.

And yet, beginning in the 1920s, GM was able to snatch market dominance away from Ford by better catering to people’s fantasies – much in the same way that Apple has been able to poach market share from Microsoft and others. 

2012 isn’t 1952, and cars and computers are not the same, but being able to sense and articulate a vision is still the job of marketers. What’s our vision for our own future, today? And why do so many people want to use their minimalist iPhones to take altered pictures of their friends?

Buy it now, or not: eBay can’t sell GM’s cars

Life is tough for General Motors. Once the world’s largest and most powerful automaker, the Great Recession put the final nail in the coffin of a company that had grown too large and too lackadaisical to survive.

But thanks to Chapter 11 bankruptcy and the support of the United States government, GM is trying to reinvent itself. It’s spending lots of money trying to convince consumers to give its cars a second look and it’s looking for new solutions to old problems.