Google Trends

Seven useful Google tips for bloggers & publishers

Blogging ain’t easy, especially when you’re starting from scratch, but there are many tools available that can make your life easier and potentially help drive more traffic to your site than you expected.

First I’ll make one thing abundantly clear, and this is a caveat you’ll read on any respectable website regarding SEO, if there’s one overarching factor that you should always consider when producing content, it’s quality. 

Always ask yourself “is the content I’m uploading to the web useful, entertaining, informative, engaging or innovative?” If it isn’t at least one of those things then you’re never going to achieve any gains in traffic, audience growth or authority.

There are of course exceptions to the rule and it’s difficult sometimes to remain objective when it comes to certain seemingly low-quality websites. But then if these websites are successful, they’re obviously catering for a certain demand.

Of course if you’re also someone who spends all day creating animated unicorn GIFs then I take my hat off to you. As I said, there are always exceptions to the rule and objectivity is hard.

Anyway, no matter what you’re publishing there are some brilliant and relatively simple ways that Google can help your content be seen, be indexed quickly and keep you out of trouble.

Five demoralising Google Trends

Google Trends is a time vacuum. Many a time I’ve been lost, exploring abstruse, spurious and tantalising connections between search terms, instead of doing actual work.

Below, with more than a hint of my own tastes, I’ve screenshot some of what I consider to be dispiriting Google Trends (one of the more fun uses of Trends).

See if you agree with my pseudo-pop-culture laments. Yes, this is a pre-UK holiday post, a bit of fun, but, with the inclusion of YouTube search data in Google Trends as of this week, now is a great time to get stuck in yourselves.

Twitter: was there a Ross / Fry effect?

Already enjoying strong growth in the UK, many were predicting that the service would go mainstream after getting after exposure on the Jonathan Ross comeback show last week.

Well, it seems that being discussed by Ross and Stephen Fry has had a significant impact on Twitter’s traffic.