hackers

Yahoo faces major security breach: reports

It’s no surprise that companies on the consumer internet are collecting a lot of information about their users — with and without the permission of those users. And that means there are plenty of databases that make an attractive target for hackers.

Unfortunately for users, many of those databases aren’t secured properly, and as we’ve seen time and time again, best practices for how certain pieces of information, such as passwords, are stored go unfollowed.

LinkedIn faces major security breach: report

While Facebook’s stock languishes, shares of the world’s most popular social network for professionals, LinkedIn, have been treated far more kindly. With a forward price-to-earnings ratio of approximately 75, investors are betting that LinkedIn’s future is bright.

But the company may be in for a rough patch as word broke today that some 6.5m passwords have been stolen from the social network.

Knowledge, due diligence are the keys to using the cloud

From infrastructure-as-a-service (Iaas) all the way up to software-as-a-service (SaaS), more and more companies are heading into the cloud.

There are plenty of good reasons. Using a cloud offering can often reduce a company’s technology capex, and pay-as-you-go pricing is an attractive proposition for companies burned in the past by large, expensive technology initiatives.

Is the age of innocence over for the Mac?

If you own a Windows-based computer, it may be hard to believe that many of your Mac counterparts don’t run antivirus software.

Viruses and malware are a fact of life for Windows owners, and as a
result, there is a sizable ecosystem of security software vendors whose
mission in life is to protect PC owners from the constantly growing
number of threats.

But Mac owners may be getting a taste of the hassles PC
owners have become accustomed to…

Five lessons from the Gawker, McDonald’s data breaches

What does online gossip rag Gawker have in common with fast food restaurant chain
McDonald’s? In the past several days, both have fallen victim to
hackers who gained access to user databases.

The Gawker hack, in particular, has garnered a lot of attention because
the hackers seem most interested in humiliating the popular blog. They
have released the emails and passwords of more than 1m of Gakwer’s
registered users.

SEOs are not spammers, evildoers, or opportunists

It seems like every few months, somebody has to write a blog post
calling SEO a ‘scam‘ of some sort. It’s a meme that always works and
this time around, it’s coming from a guy named Derek Powazek, who calls
SEOs “spammers, evildoers, and opportunists“.

It’s a great linkbait, which, ironically, is sure to help Powazek’s SERPs.

The New York Times falls victim to a sophisticated ad scam

When visitors to The New York Times website began falling victim to a fake anti-virus ad that attempted to install malware on readers’ computers, some, myself included, suspected that the ad was probably being served through an ad network.

According to The Times, about half of the ads that are served on its website come from ad networks and they are an obvious target for scammers looking to distribute rogue ads that deliver malware.

But as it turns out, the rogue ad that was wreaking havoc with some Times readers was actually sold by The New York Times itself.

WordPress attack catches bloggers off guard, but it shouldn’t have

Over the weekend, reports surfaced of a seemingly widespread attack targeting older versions of the popular blogging software WordPress. The attack leaves WordPress installations severely compromised and appears to be part of a campaign to spread spam and malicious code.

Numerous bloggers found themselves victims. One of those bloggers was popular tech personality Robert Scoble. He claims that two months of his blog’s content was lost and that his site was booted from Google’s index because of malicious code that had been inserted (ouch).

Serious security vulnerability hits Adobe Acrobat Reader 9 and earlier

Adobe Acrobat Reader is as close to ubiquitous as it comes. Most new Windows-based computers come with installed and many websites offer up documents in PDF format.

That makes Acrobat Reader a juicy target for hackers and a critical vulnerability has been discovered in Acrobat Reader versions 9 and earlier that could expose users to serious risk.