HMV

Fight Club! Death to iTunes special: Google Play, Amazon, Spotify and more

Let’s put this to bed.

I’ve spent the last couple of weeks trying to find a decent replacement for iTunes. 

The reasons why I want to abandon the world’s most popular music download service are many and varied.

iTunes is a deeply flawed experience. It’s impersonal and slow, with lack of support for different file formats. It has a stubbornly rigid pricing model and no browser access whatsoever.

In fact I rarely use the platform to download. Instead I use a collection of different digital download sites to purchase MP3s online. 

Yet I still use iTunes almost exclusively to organise and access my songs on both desktop and smartphone.

Surely there’s an easier way. Well I’m going to try and find one. For the good of you, me and the music loving public of the world.

HMV’s responsive journey back to digital

This week sees the unveiling of HMV’s completely overhauled responsive website, HMV.com

This follows the recent desktop and app launch of HMV Digital, a music download service which aims to rival iTunes.

It’s easy to dwell on HMV’s troubled recent past: the economic downturn, the rise of the internet, eventual liquidation. But let’s not do that here, after all HMV is very much looking towards the future.

Let’s take a look at its new responsive website in detail.

Now is the time to embrace showrooming

A new TNS study across 43 countries suggests that 21% of shoppers use smartphones in store to ‘showroom’, 43% read reviews, 31% compare prices and 25% seek advice before they buy from friends and family.  

This phenomenon has put the fear of God into many within the retail industry, woken businesses up to the link between the high street and internet and made retailers aware that they are not ready to service this reality.

We’ve seen Jessops and HMV go into administration in recent months and Best Buy shrink. The culprit? Supposedly showrooming.

Five of the top social fails of 2013 so far

In 2012 some of the world’s biggest brands treated us to some truly spectacular blunders on social media.

My personal favourite was KitchenAid’s attack on President Obama’s dead grandmother, though the Swedish Tourist Board also deserves an honourable mention for its potty-mouthed, anti-Semitic tweets.

Thankfully brands haven’t learned from other’s mistakes so the social fails have continued apace in 2013.

Obviously it’s wrong to make fun of people’s mistakes and revel in their failures, but it’s also important to document social fails as a warning to others (sort of)…