Hollywood

Hollywood’s response to digital disruption looks like a flop

Digital disruption has been felt in Hollywood, and even if it’s not all doom and gloom as some old media skeptics suggest, there’s no doubt that Hollywood firms have been forced to rethink how they create and sell their content.

But some of the latest moves Hollywood players are reportedly considering as they address the changing media landscape beg the question: is Hollywood totally missing the plot?

Coming soon: paid YouTube channels?

When Google purchased YouTube for $1.65bn in late 2006, some wondered whether the acquisition would be the Web 2.0 equivalent of Yahoo’s ill-fated billion-dollar purchase of Broadcast.com during the first .com boom.

It was hard not to be somewhat skeptical: YouTube was an expensive operation to run and was facing the same type of legal assault from Hollywood that basically killed Napster 1.0 years earlier.

Facebook: little more than an extra for Hollywood?

Hollywood and social media may seem like a match, but if Facebook is a big part of ‘social media’, the movie version of the relationship may not have a happy ending.

Last year, just as the world’s largest social network was prepping to go public, it was publicly dissed by automaker GM, which said it was cutting its spend on paid Facebook paid ads.

Now it looks like movie studios, not sure of the ROI from their Facebook investments, may be following in GM’s footsteps.

The rise of video in 2013

As companies further embrace the need for content, video is becoming a bigger part of editorial calendars and content teams.

Gone are the days of shooting a 10 minute interview and slapping it up on YouTube. Consumers’ tastes have become more sophisticated and short form video content has become our brain candy.

But what will 2013 bring the industry in terms of video?