Intel

Native advertising: The emperor’s new clothes?

Great native advertising cannot be automated.

To think about selling on a CPM basis and defining native advertising as simply a question of format, rather than content, is wrong.

The value of a native ad campaign resides in the quality of the content, therefore the engagement with the piece – and that’s more than just a click, it’s time on page and a share count (and potentially an associated action).

At the IAB Content Conference, I listened to a number of speakers with interesting angles on native advertising.

Here I’ll share Nick Bradley‘s (Northern & Shell) healthily sceptical view of native, including (more positively) some examples of native advertising done well.

For a full intro to native advertising see the new Econsultancy report, Native Advertising: What it means for brands and publishers.

Six examples of B2B companies that shine on Twitter

I recently blogged about consumer brands that had come up with successful Twitter strategies, highlighting ASOS and Nike among others as companies that knew what they were doing with social.

Many commenters mentioned that it would be useful to see a similar post focusing on B2B examples and I was obviously happy to oblige. 

Twitter is a difficult medium for B2B companies as it’s all too easy to simply view the platform as a broadcast medium and churn out dull corporate messages.

But here are six examples of businesses that have managed to buck the trend and create interesting or useful Twitter feeds…

Big brands capture reactions to ads with new video technology

A few years ago, I had coffee with Nick Langeveld, who left Nielsen to run business development for an interesting company called Affectiva. He was telling me how the company, an MIT labs spin-off, was going to make measurement in a new direction by measuring people’s facial expressions.

Like Intel, who is going to start shipping set top boxes that know who is watching television, Affectiva is using the ability to watch consumers through their webcams as they consume video, and measure the emotions in real-time.

Now, marketers could see the exact moment when they captured surprise, delight, or revulsion in a consumer—and scale that effort to anyone with a webcam, who opted into their panel. This sounded great, but I wondered if and when large marketers would adopt such technology.

Will Tizen give Android a run for its money?

Ask folks about mobile operating systems and most will probably tell you that it’s a two-horse race: Apple’s iOS versus Google’s Android.

The mobile OS landscape isn’t this way because other companies haven’t tried.

Microsoft has done some interesting things with Windows Phone, and Palm’s webOS looked pretty darn promising when it launched.