internationalisation

ASOS.cn front page

Five reasons ASOS is pulling out of China

ASOS is calling time on its Chinese adventure.

It will still serve Chinese customers through its global website and ship clothes from Europe, but its local warehouse and 60 Shanghai-based staff will go.

Here are five reasons ASOS pulled the plug.

Five tips for retailers targeting international expansion

It’s no surprise that retail brands are increasingly looking to expand beyond their core market.

The opportunity to become established at an international level, engage new customers and ultimately, open up additional revenue streams is an enticing prospect for any brand with ambitions for growth.

Five golden rules when localising for international ecommerce

Understanding what local customers really expect when purchasing from an ecommerce site is an essential factor for success when it comes to international expansion.

Failing to properly localise a website to be in line with local conventions will not only impact how users perceive a brand and feel about using a website, but ultimately effect how likely they are to buy from it at all.

How Whistles is tailoring its ecommerce site to international markets

The internationalisation of ecommerce is one of the main priorities for established brands, with foreign markets providing huge potential for business growth.

But this obviously brings with it a new range of challenges in terms of localised content, currency options and different fulfilment methods.

Luxury clothing retailer Whistles is currently just starting a process of internationalising its online store, so head of ecommerce Louise Salt knows a lot about the challenges of expanding into new markets.

At Demandware’s Xchange ’14 event Salt described how the company was approaching the challenge of catering to international shoppers.

How does internationalisation work for online retailers?

If 95% of success is showing up then in online retail business the arrival of good platforms, cheap translation services and global banking means pretty much anyone can ‘show up’.

The service can be transferred into the new market, the website translated, the new currency added and you’re ready to sell to the new region.

Should I translate my website?

With orders received from other non-English speaking countries and a desire to expand, many companies are faced with a choice of how far to go with the localisation of their site. 

New research helps brands make that decision, from a full localisation of site and all campaigns, to a partial localisation of just the keywords and ads.