jargon

Econsultancy’s colossal digital marketing jargon-buster

We have a simple goal here at Econsultancy, to make the digital world a better place. 

We do this is by helping every visitor, client and delegate sort through the clutter of digital marketing, and our role here on the blog however is to help on a more day-to-day basis.

We aim to provide useful tips, guidance and best practice advice in a manner that we hope is as jargon-free as possible, to make digital marketing easy to understand for everyone at any level. 

Which is why I’m very proud to present Econsultancy’s Colossal Jargon-Buster, a handy A-Z guide to the most useful and common terms that you’ll come across in the digital marketing world. 

Why I hate webinars, and the importance of copywriting for UX

Webinars are annoying, ultimately, because we are designed for face to face communication. However, they are extremely useful if your colleagues and customers are ‘global’.

There are many annoying things about webinar tech, but most of them centre on UX. And central to UX is getting your language right.

Webex, as my chosen example, simply didn’t work with a good copywriter when laying out its back-end and webinar UI. I can’t speak for others such as Adobe Connect, as I haven’t used them myself.

I don’t think Webex is attempting to appear natty or complex, using slightly mystifying words or combinations of words. It’s just badly written.

Here are some examples:

Users prefer facts to marketing jargon: Nielsen

Nobody likes reading marketing jargon, yet all corporate websites rely on a certain amount of fluffy language to fill their pages and sell their services.

However two studies from the Nielsen Norman Group indicate that content that’s rich with facts and short on jargon is actually a more effective way of attracting people to your website.

It should be pointed out from the start that these studies tested journalists and people using investor relation (IR) pages on corporate websites, so it’s difficult to draw any direct parallels with consumer copywriting.

But even so, I would suggest that the findings still give a useful indicator of the kind of content that web users are interested in.

20 heinous examples of PR and social media jargon

We’re not big fans of jargon and PR speak on this blog, and we did round up some of our least favourite words and phrases a few years ago. 

We also have a banned words and phrases section in our blog style guide, which aims to keep godawful phrases like ‘paradigm shift’ and synergies’ off the pages of this blog. 

People keep coming up with this guff though, so I’ve listed some further crimes against the English language…