Kevin Rose

Five lessons learned from Digg’s rise and fall

Social news site Digg was once one of the most popular services on the internet. An early social media darling, Digg and its founder, Kevin Rose, were the subject of numerous high-profile articles, including an embarrassing (and not-entirely-accurate) BusinessWeek cover piece with the headline How This Kid Made $60 Million In 18 Months.

It wasn’t just the media lavishing attention on Digg: investors poured big money — some $45m in total — into the company. 

But what goes up often comes down and as it turned out for Digg, the company’s future was not going to be nearly as bright as its early years. Yesterday, the company’s assets, including the code for the Digg site itself and its domain, were sold to New York-based development firm Betaworks for a reported $500,000.

Google buys Meebo to bolster Google+ team

Think acquihires are limited to relatively small deals for relatively small, young companies? Think again.

Google, which is aggressively investing in Google+ despite widespread skepticism over its prospects, yesterday confirmed the rumors that it is acquiring toolbar and ad service Meebo.

Can this man save Google’s social strategy?

How important is social to Google’s future?

It depends on who you ask. Some believe that if Google doesn’t find a way to compete in the space, Facebook might eventually eat its lunch.

Those who are a tad more skeptical suggest that Google and its advertising money machine don’t need social to thrive.

Time will tell which camp is right, but Google has already decided. With the launch of Google+ and Search, plus Your World, it’s clear that the search giant is committed to giving its all in an effort to become a meaningful player in the social market.

Digg’s demise: are VCs and founder cash-outs partly to blame?

Digg is dead. Sure, the company won’t be disappearing today,
tomorrow or next week, but to anyone who lived through the first .com
bust, the writing is on the wall: the company’s redesign woes and
yesterday’s 37% staff reduction don’t bode well for its future prospects.

For Digg to survive and thrive once again, it’s going to have to beat the kind of odds that few companies do.

Is Digg digging itself into a hole with its new design?

Digg may have been a Web 2.0 pioneer, but out of all the mature startups loosely grouped into the ‘social media’ category, it’s one of the companies some might argue is well past its prime. While other upstarts born around mid-decade, such as Facebook and Twitter, continue to rise, Digg seems to be treading water.

That, of course, is not to say that Digg isn’t very popular. It is. And that’s not to say that it can’t do wonderful things for publishers who hit the front page. It can.

But for both consumers and publishers alike, the Facebook and Twitters of the world have largely become more important when it comes to sharing and discovering interesting content on the web.

Digg gets into the toolbar, URL shortening market

Digg, the popular content sharing website that lets users ‘vote‘ for their favorite content on the web, is a favorite of online publishers. Get Digged enough and you might hit the Digg homepage, which can drive tens of thousands of visitors in short order.

Currently, there are two ways to Digg content: on the Digg website or through a button that publishers place on their web pages.