Kred

Only 20% of Fortune 100 CMOs are active in social networks

As social leadership is an increased focus for global businesses, BusinessNext went in search of the top 25 CMOs in Fortune 100 Companies. In the end, they could only find 20 as only one in five CMOs on the Fortune 100 list are active in public social networks. I’d concur, though, that number is higher than previous years. 

Despite The CMO Survey’s recent projection of an 150% increase in social spending in marketing budgets over the next five years, the majority of the senior staff holding the purse strings are yet to establish a social footprint of their own. Is this an indication that they don’t understand the space, or is it that they put their efforts in promoting the brands they work for instead of the brand of “me”?

Why people hate Klout, and how to fix it

Since inception, online influencer targeting has been a fraught activity.

In the early 2000s, brands had to fight the temptation to simply create their own fake influencers. Perfection of mommy blog targeting (one product for you and one to give away to your fans) was often achieved at the cost of polarizing their community over issues of authenticity. If individuals can’t trust their community leaders to not be unduly influenced by what are perceived as bribes, who can they trust?

Klout, which familiarized a mass of consumers with influence measurement, has regularly been the subject of withering criticism. “Kill me if I Klout,” wrote the gadget-catchall Gizmodo. “If I’ve ever interacted with Klout… punch me in the face,” said the net-comic XKCD.

Econsultancy’s latest report, Influencer Channels: From Klout to Klouchebag, takes a look at these issues, asks why, and explores ways for marketers to effectively work around these antipathies.

Klout vs Kred in the social influence game

We are in a time of convergence. Traditionally, influence was in the hands of the media. Now anyone with access to a cell phone can be engaged and influence a community. As our online identities now focus on our real name, personal brand isn’t merely a celebrity worry anymore.
 
How this influence is measured is changing and Klout and Kred (amongst others) are all vying to be the barometer that we use to measure it. But which one is going to top the other or is there room for them all?