lastminute.com

Why Lastminute.com is taking control of its ad inventory

Last week, lastminute.com group announced its new media business, The Travel People.

In such an interesting time for online advertising, I wanted to know what this means for lastminute.com group and the advertising on its sites.

Mirroring big publisher websites, is this a move towards more bespoke campaigns and away from standard display?

lastminute.com hits the content sweet spot

What is travel?

Airbnb is certainly trying to define it, with the message that inclusion and community make for memorable experiences. We shouldn’t stand for standard, the homogeneity of a hotel chain.

The internet in general is encouraging a fightback again corporate globalisation (though perhaps these are simply our death throes?), with everything from homespun craft available through Etsy and crowdsourced cycle routes on Strava.

I watched John Kearns perform recently (a storytelling comic that won the Edinburgh Comedy Award) and he had one line designed to show how much he wanted to return to a more personal world.

He spoke about seeing tourists in the more garish areas of London promoted by guidebooks, such as Picadilly Circus, and how he wanted to talk to each of them and tell them about the really niche and beautiful parts of London, often tucked in neighbourhoods that tourists never make it to.

I’m getting to the point here. lastminute.com has produced a lovely piece of content designed to show parts of London that only the discerning have discovered*. It’s called 100 Things in London and it’s a nice bit of content marketing.

Let’s take a look and I’ll attempt to point out why it should go well.