lawsuits

Suing over an online review: is it ever a good idea?

Thanks to the internet and the rise of business reviews sites, dealing with customers has arguably never been more complicated.

Never before has it been more important to cultivate strong customer relationships and to find ways to parlay them into online reviews that, in some cases, can be powerful drivers of business.

PeopleBrowsr fights for its Twitter firehose

After Facebook, Twitter is arguably the highest-profile social network out there, and could conceivably follow in the footsteps of the world’s largest social network with a public offering of its own in 2013.

Facebook and Twitter both face challenges. Facebook’s most pressing challenge: how to monetize its billion-plus users. Twitter’s most pressing challenge: how to transition from a communications platform provider to a media company.

US likely to pursue antitrust case against Google: report

In 1998, the United States Department of Justice and 20 states filed a lawsuit against Microsoft alleging that the software giant abused a monopoly position in the market to dominate the market for web browsers.

The stakes were high. If it lost, Microsoft could have been forced to break itself into two parts. And even though it eventually settled under more favorable terms, the case against Microsoft is arguably the defining moment in the company’s history.

The disadvantage of funding: patent trolls

Many of the headlines relating to today’s patent system absurdity involve big companies like Google, Oracle, Apple and Samsung. And for good reason: they have big money, and the most to gain (or lose) when it comes to patent disputes.

But patents are increasingly affecting smaller companies and upstarts, and not in a good way. In fact, it’s getting so bad that startups raising capital might not want to celebrate their funding too loudly these days.

US judge keeps Samsung Galaxy Tab ban in place

In the patent war between two of the largest consumer electronics companies in the world, Samsung and Apple, Apple won another victory yesterday as US judge Lucy Koh kept in place a ban on sales of Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet.

What’s more: last Friday, Judge Koh placed a ban on sales of one of Samsung’s phones, the Galaxy Nexus.

Judge in Oracle-Google case: you cannot copyright an API

There’s arguably never been a better time for technology companies and developers. The proliferation of billions of connected devices, coupled with the explosion of new platforms and services, has created countless business opportunities, many still yet to be exploited.

But thanks to increasingly complex litigation around intellectual property, namely patents, the technology industry has also arguably never had to deal with so many headaches.

Jury sides with Google in Oracle patent infringment suit

Google executives are probably breathing a sigh of relief today after a jury ruled that the search giant did not infringe upon Oracle’s patents in the high-profile intellectual property battle being waged between two of the world’s largest and richest technology companies.

The jury was tasked with determining whether Google was guilty of patent infringment on eight separate claims involving Android.

Yahoo CEO resigns amid resume scandal

When Scott Thompson decided to leave his post as President of PayPal to join Yahoo as CEO, it reportedly came as a shock to eBay CEO John Donahoe.

And it was a surprising move according to some industry observers.

After all, Thompson was ditching Ebay’s fastest growing division to join a company that has been in decline.

It’s a decision Thompson may regret for a long time.

Will the Oracle-Google lawsuit kill the API?

As Google and Oracle duke it out in court over claims that the search giant violated copyrights and patents now owned by Oracle in developing Android, it appears that the battle may have wide-ranging ramifications.

Yesterday, a jury decided that Google violated Oracle copyrights related to the organization and structure of Oracle’s Java APIs, but was unable to decide whether Google had a valid fair use claim.