lists

Simple Twitter experiments to restore that boxfresh feeling

There is nothing sadder than reflecting on the earlier days of a community or service and complaining about how much things have changed.

So let’s just take it for granted that there’s an element of that in this but not dwell too much. 

Instead, I’d like to focus on something more important: how you shake things up when the timeline that used to delight and inform you begins to feel saggy and boring.

Think of it like marriage-counselling for a tool that many of us spend more time with than our significant others.

(If you have your own tips, let me know.)

Email reputation: what is the expiration date of your opt-ins?

Email reputation: what is the expiration date of your opt-ins? Assuming that you’re an email marketer with a conscience (and that knows a little about deliverability) you only send emails to people that opted in.

Maybe you even chose to go with a double opt-in system, to be 100% sure that your recipients are actually interested in your emails.

But although you are now complying to the email marketing legislation, these efforts aren’t enough to prevent that you’ll be regarded as a spammer.

An opt-in’s sustainability isn’t endless. Think about your email reputation and ask your recipients to prolong their subscriptions from time to time. 

Women write about PR too: some of the UK’s top female bloggers

Yesterday, PR agency 10Yetis put together an updated list of the top 20 most influential UK PR bloggers, according to the Advertising Age Power 150 blogs list. 

‘Head Yeti’ Andy Barr noted that recently there’s been a shuffle in response to a new ranking algorithm, and that there are far more British entries from a broader spread of companies that include SEO and PR, advertising and ‘direct response specialists’.

But I, and others, noted that there’s not one woman on the list.

10 reasons why list-based posts work well online

Humans appear to be hardwired to tune into lists, judging by our Google Analytics data from 2010. Half of Econsultancy’s most popular 25 posts were lists, including nine out of the top 10.

I don’t subscribe to the idea that lists are somehow inferior to articles with lots of dense multi-idea paragraphs. Either the content is good, or it’s not. The list format is precisely that: a format, a simple framework for communicating ideas.

So here, in no particular order, are 10 reasons why readers and publishers love lists, and why they work so well online… and yes, my tongue is firmly planted in my cheek as I’m writing this.