Made.com

30 brands with excellent social media strategies

Okay, it’s probably disingenuous to pretend that social media is still something nascent and unproven for brands.

Even with a tricky attribution problem to solve, most brand marketers and advertisers agree it just makes sense to target these large, active and known audiences.

Having said that, some brands ‘got’ social media a lot quicker than others.

MADE.COM on the value of social commerce

Though social is now recognised as an integral part of the marketing mix, many still question its place in commerce.

That’s why it was so fascinating to catch up with Hannah Pilpel, social project manager at MADE.COM, to find out what value the brand finds in social.

Hannah revealed some stats as to the monetary value of a social shopper, as well as sharing the brand’s channel insight.

How Made.com succeeds on Pinterest

Promoted Pins have recently rolled out in the UK, having been trialled in the US since January 2015.

Made.com immediately jumped aboard, extending its use of the social network that has contributed greatly to the brand’s growth.

Here’s how MADE is succeeding with Pinterest…

Five examples of peer approval in ecommerce

Social commerce is, to some, an oxymoron.

Why would I want my social networks sullied with special offers and calls to action?

With the ‘buy’ buttons implemented by Facebook and Twitter apparently having little to no success (why keep customers away from retailer websites?) there has to be a smarter way to use social dynamics in ecommerce.

There is. Retailers are starting to use social for retention, enabling their most valuable customers to gain prestige by featuring on the brand’s own website or social network.

madeshowroom

Five retailers using NFC and RFID to enhance shopping: but do they work?

Let’s take a look at who is using this technology in retail.

I’m not looking at payment here, which NFC has been mired in, merely how the shopping experience can be enhanced.

I’ll get a few things off my chest about what works and what doesn’t. First, a super quick differentiation between the two technologies.

Near field communication (NFC) is capable of two way communication, so payment (a debit and credit) for example, or even in medicine (a tag in your skin could send vital signs to your smartphone), and it works only at short distances. NFC can be used more basically, to simply transmit set information to a phone or tablet.

Radio frequency identification (RFID) has been around for yonks, the tags only transmit information, to an RFID reader (an NFC enabled phone or tablet such as an Android can be used as a reader, but for an iPhone a separate reader is required). These tags have been traditionally used in stock control.

There’s bluetooth low energy (e.g. iBeacons) in the mix, too. However, many of the uses of beacons have been for push messaging to customers.

In this piece I’m not going to be talking about geofencing which can be done with RFID, GPS or low energy bluetooth (iBeacons). I’ll be focusing on active rather than passive engagement, though I’ll discuss iBeacons in my conclusion (as they’re rapidly taking hold in many of the same scenarios).

Right, now that’s taken care of, let’s dive in…

Made.com: a case study of customer service hell?

Almost two years ago we wrote about Made.com, which had just launched after receiving £2.5m of backing from the likes of Brent Hoberman.

Made.com is a bit like Naked Wines for the furniture, in that it bypasses retailers, connecting consumers directly with wholesalers in order to supply “beautiful furniture without the high street markup”. It’s an innovative idea that we liked, and we said it had an excellent chance of success. 

However, there’s a problem. I’m one of the people at Econsultancy who receives comment notifications for our blog, and that Made.com post regularly attracts unhappy customers who complain about poor service, faulty products, cancelled orders, the courier company, and – most commonly – the lack of a telephone number on its website. It’s been bugging me.

Made.com launches with £2.5m funding

Made.com, a furniture retailer which ‘cuts out the middle man’ launched yesterday, backed by £2.5m in funding from Brent Hoberman, PROfounders and others. 

The company was founded by entrepreneur Ning Li, and aims to bring down the cost of furniture by cutting out the wholesaler and the retailer and selling direct to the public. 

I’ve been taking a look at the new site…