Madison Avenue

Advertisers shouldn’t fear the Fiscal Cliff

It can be easy to forget that at this time four years ago, the future of the global economy was in limbo. Financial markets around the world were in chaos and the specter of a global depression was being taken seriously.

Today, the internet economy is booming and retailers are expressing optimism for the holiday shopping season.

But under the surface, there is growing concern. As AdAge points out, if you take away all of the advertising activity around the Olympics and the United States election cycle, ad sales have been softer this year. And now advertisers have a new worry: the Fiscal Cliff.

Amazon courts Madison Avenue

Amazon is the master of online retailing, and is proving that it’s capable of making it easy for consumers to find and buy whatever they’re looking for across digital channels.

But don’t let Amazon’s ecommerce dominance fool you: the company’s ambitions extend well beyond simply selling product. Increasingly, the company is looking to take advantage of its position to extend its reach into new markets, including, now, advertising.

Omnicom cozies up to Google in a big way

Media buyers are increasingly moving more and more dollars to digital, but as far as percentages go, digital advertising still has a lot of upside potential. The companies that stand to realize that potential, of course, are advertising powerhouses like Google.

Google isn’t idly standing by waiting for media buyers to shift budgets. Yesterday, the Wall Street Journal wrote that Google has struck a deal with giant agency holding company Omnicom that will see Omnicom spend hundreds of millions of dollars on display ads through Google’s ad exchange over the next two years.

Are Apple’s iAds really worth seven or eight figures?

For those who admire Apple, it’s always interesting to watch the loyalty Apple commands from its most loyal customers and how that loyalty manifests itself. It has been said that Apple CEO Steve Jobs accomplishes his magic through the use of a ‘Reality Distortion Field.’

The Steve Jobs Reality Distortion Field isn’t, however, simply limited to consumers (or the media). Apparently it is making its way to Madison Avenue.