malicious ads

Why does the LSE website have advertising?

As one might imagine, running a stock exchange is a fairly profitable business. Case in point: the London Stock Exchange (LSE), which earns over $100m a year in profit running one of the world’s most recognizable equities markets.

Most of that profit is, of course, derived from the operations of markets and ancillary market services, such as the distribution of stock information. Yet if you go to the LSE website, you might notice that the exchange has no qualms about making a little bit extra on the side through display advertising.

Google fights scammers with one strike and you’re out policy

Malicious ads are on the rise and just as AdWords is an appealing platform for legitimate advertisers looking for a massive audience, Google’s self-serve ad service is a juicy target for scammers looking for the same.

From ads that hawk scammy get-rich-quick products to ads that lead users to web pages infested with malware, malicious ads pose a significant threat to Google. After all, if users come to fear where Google’s results (paid or unpaid) might lead them, Google risks losing one of its most valuable assets: the trust and confidence of its users.

Gawker the latest victim of malicious ad buyers

Old media and new media may do battle in the quest for consumer eyeballs but they increasingly have a common foe: malicious ad buyers.

Last month, the New York Times fell victim to a sophisticated scam in which a scammer was able to buy ad inventory directly from the news giant posing as a past buyer of ads on behalf of VoIP company Vonage. The Times had to scramble to locate the malicious ad when legitimate-looking ads were swapped for malware-serving ads.

Malicious ads: are lawsuits on the way?

Online criminals are looking to infect your computer and they’re increasingly turning to online ads to deliver malicious software.

The New York Times was recently hit by a sophisticated scam in which criminals pretended to purchase ads for a well-known, legitimate brand, only to later serve an ad hawking fake anti-virus software laced with malware.