Marvel

Six wonderful examples of marketing creative for your entertainment

In November Econsultancy is hosting the Festival of Marketing, a two-day celebration of the modern marketing industry, featuring speakers from brands including LEGO, Tesco, Barclays, FT.com and more.

One of the themes of the event is Brand & Creative, so to give some inspiration on this topic I’ve collated some of the most eye-catching examples of creativity in marketing that I’ve seen recently.

So sit back and peruse these wonderful marketing campaigns, then buy yourself a ticket to the Festival of Marketing

YouTube strategy for brands: 10 of the best

Only 74 of the top 5,000 YouTube channels are from brands.

This research comes from Touchstorm’s latest study, The Touchstorm Video Index, covering Q3 2013 and concentrating on the ‘YouTube 5,000’, an elite group of channels with at least 43m views each.

Of those 5,000 channels, only 2% are owned by brands. That means there are 4,926 teenagers with webcams, older people with camcorders, vloggers with flipcams, bedroom animators with smartphones and various other fashionistas, musicians, close-up magicians, action figure critics and amateur film-makers who are completely dominating the platform and squeezing out the big companies.

What can brands do about this? Is there any hope for them?

Here are some key findings from the report, along with our own insight, ideas for strategy and a look at the brands who are using YouTube successfully.

How Marvel is revolutionising comic books with digital

Digital is becoming ever more important for the comic industry.

Although the industry is guarded when it comes to revealing figures,  Comixology (which release digital comics from the major publishers and many independents) has cited reaching 50m downloads in January 2012 and doubling that figure to 100m only 10 months later in October.

Physical comic book sales have been pushing against the tide of declining sales in other print media for some time now, with 2012 showing a 15% increase in sales year on year, and 2013 showing a similar trend.

It’s clear the success of digital comics is increasing rapidly and concurrently with print, and it’s Marvel, who in the last few years has shown incredible skill in rebuilding its own brand, which is offering a lot more in terms of technology and service in its range of apps for mobiles and tablets. 

Building a brand the mighty Marvel way

Superman. Batman. Iron Man. Of the three, the DC characters have historically been far more recognisable.

There’s no denying that Marvel comics has had a stellar recent run at the movies, but step back to 2005 and you’d have been hard-pressed to find anyone outside the bubble of comic-book fandom who knew or cared about Tony Stark’s armoured alter-ego.

So how has Marvel Entertainment managed to propel its lesser-known characters to success, while the far more recognisable properties owned by rival DC Comics have often languished in development hell?

It’s all about brand continuity…