navigation

Five apps & websites that ditched the hamburger menu

The hamburger menu has always been contentious, with many believing its rather smug parallel lines are too abstract, not understood by all users.

Even as the icon proliferated, as more and more company websites went responsive, it has seldom been viewed as a standard.

Shazop review: designer comparison site is clunky on mobile

Shazop is a new service aggregating designer fashion products and allowing consumers to find the best prices online.

The proposition is fantastic but there’s a little work to do before the mobile experience is silky smooth.

Here’s the full website review.

11 unusual examples of ecommerce navigation

Celebrating the weird, the different and the atypical.

Sure we have a set few ideas about user experience and what we consider best practice, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for experimentation.

The following examples offer a different view, whether it’s in their search tools or in the way they present their products.

Some of the following are perhaps better in principle rather than execution, and none of them should be considered as anything more than ‘interesting’, however you may just find some inspiration here…

10 sneaky examples of hidden website menus

It’s becoming more popular for websites to hide its navigation off screen, only revealing a menu when you interact with an element.

The interaction can be a click or a hover, the element is normally a hamburger menu, but occasionally its text or symbol based. Either way this practice is a good way to clean up the clutter of your website.

Here are 10 examples, each providing a slightly different take on the trend.

How John Lewis, M&S and Debenhams handle on-site search

Not wishing to sound too astoundingly obvious right off the bat, but your on-site search tool is a key way in which visitors look for products on your website, especially if you carry a huge range of items. 

The surprising thing is how easy it is to get on-onsite search wrong: bad placement, lack of auto-suggest, poorly displayed search results, and so on. 

Five ways to adapt your travel website to make holidaymakers happy

With 71% of customers expecting assistance when stuck within five minutes, high rates of abandonment, and a diverse range of platforms from which customers can speak, it has never been more important to listen to the voice of your customer.

Indeed, we have collected nearly 1.5m handwritten nuggets of information from almost 400 sites.

So, what niggles the modern day holiday maker? What prevents them from converting? And, most importantly, what can you do to keep them from journeying away from your site and into the arms of your competitor?

Sports Direct: check out those calls to action!

Sports Direct is brilliant. Ok, it had some problems last year as its reputation took a blow thanks to the retailer’s use of zero hour contracts, but on the sales front, it’s flying along.

New stores are opening, other sports retailers are being battered into submission and 2,000 staff members are to receive a cool £100k bonus after profits climbed by 40% to £200m last year.

With 12 languages and 10 currency options, the Sports Direct website should continue to aid the company’s growing profits.

The website has been praised in many quarters. It’s certainly easy to use and strongly conveys the brand’s identity.

Visiting the site I was struck by just how good its calls to action are, and how easy it is to get around (unlike their stores). I thought I’d round up a few of the best bits.

Enjoy them in all their enormous garish glory. I think they’re part of a growing lust for simplicity that is driving web design forward.

Which ecommerce sites are getting it right? Here’s 21 of the best…

Which ecommerce sites are setting a great example for others to follow?  

I’ve been asking the Econsultancy blog team, as well as a few ecommerce experts, for their suggestions of great ecommerce sites. 

I’ve picked the rest, some because they offer an excellent all round experience, others aren’t perfect, but were chosen for specific aspects which others can copy/learn from….