open-source

Five awesome open-source front-end frameworks

Thanks in large part to the popularity of the open-source model, companies of all shapes and sizes have access to technologies that would have cost six and seven figures to develop in-house a half a decade ago.

From high-performance data stores to countless software libraries, there are plenty of open-source technologies that make building a sophisticated web-based service far less costly and time-consuming than it would have been.

NoSQL database provider 10gen raises $42m

The relational database may not be dead, and so-called NoSQL solutions may have been slightly overhyped, but that isn’t stopping investors from betting that the market for new types of data stores is going to be very, very big.

The latest example of that: 10gen, which is behind one of the more prominent NoSQL databases, MongoDB, has just raised a new $42m round of funding.

Coming soon: Netflix’s cloud monkeys

While Facebook’s $1bn acquisition of Instagram may be the biggest red flag yet that we’re in a bubble once again, one thing is certain: when the bubble deflates or bursts, countless companies and start-ups yet to be born will come away with more than they came to the party with.

That’s because the latest internet boom has brought us a new generation of companies that open source many of the tools and technologies they build to solve their biggest challenges.

Adobe is jumping the gun on HTML5

Last week, Adobe announced that it is abandoning Flash for mobiles and Flash for televisions.

It was a significant announcement that raised a lot of eyebrows, and led
some to question whether the end of Flash is near. One of Apple’s
biggest fanboys even went so far as to declare the company’s retreat
from mobile Steve Jobs’ last triumph.

Drupal: is an open-source star on the edge?

For some, Drupal is a powerful content management system; for others,
it’s a development framework.

With more than 2m downloads and
high-profile users like MTV UK, Estee Lauder, Fox News, and The
Economist, however, there’s no disputing the fact that Drupal is a great example
of a successful open source project.

But all may not be well in the Drupal community.

Google ditches H.264 support in Chrome

Google may be one of the world’s most respected tech companies, but it could learn a thing or two from Apple. One lesson: surprises are supposed to be good.

Yesterday, Google surprised the world with an announcement that it is dropping support for the popular H.264 video codec. Not surprisingly, this sparked an outcry from many publishers and users who now know: the codec wars are on.