open

Twitter prepping launch of advertising API: report

Last year, Facebook went public in what was one of the most highly-anticipated and, as it turned out, disastrous IPOs of all time. In the past several months, the world’s largest social network has managed to convince Wall Street that it will eventually monetize its billion-plus users.

That’s good news for the number two social network, Twitter. Last week, reports surfaced that global investment powerhouse BlackRock is reportedly looking to buy $80m of Twitter shares from early employees, and some believe that the company will look to go public as soon as this year.

Instagram gives Twitter a taste of its own medicine

Twitter wants to be a media company, and its efforts to become one have created a lot of collateral damage.

That’s not at all surprising: when the company was positioned as a communications platform with an open API, developers flocked to take advantage of the connately-flowing river of data that Twitter produces. But many of those developers, as well as companies like LinkedIn, had to be cut off as Twitter’s desire to be a media company realistically requires it to control the user experience, and how its content is displayed, in consumer channels.

Berners-Lee: the most popular services are bad for the web

Candy and soda might, under certain circumstances, have a negative
impact on an individual’s health. But most of us would probably find it
ridiculous to state that candy and soda threaten the existence of the
human race.

The man who invented the web, however, might be accused of making an
equivalent argument when it comes to the web’s version of candy and soda
— all of those ‘closed‘ services so many of us love, like Facebook and
iTunes.

Open versus closed: ideology is for losers

The battle between ‘open’ and ‘closed’ on the web started years ago.
But it remains an active front as powerful tech companies and young
upstarts alike fight for supremacy in markets new and old.

Yesterday, the debate over open versus closed took center stage at
Google’s I/O conference, where a panel of prominent tech investors
argued the merits of each. Dave McClure, a partner at Founders Fund,
raised eyebrows with a blunt statement: “Open is for losers.