orange

Euro 2016 digital campaigns: So far, so uninspiring

Another tiring maelstrom of tournament advertising is upon us.

Sport transfixes in a way that pretty much no other (broadcastable) activity does, and therefore brands know that Euro 2016 offers value for money.

TV, footballers and creative that travels/translates well is the advertising order of the day, with honourable mention for the role of Twitter and Facebook.

Q&A: Eric Mellet on the sales organization of the future

Eric Mellet is co-author of a new report published by Econsultancy entitled The Sales Organization of the Future.

The report, which is free to registered Econsultancy users, explores how product-oriented companies need to evolve into value-added services organizations to meet the changing expectations of customers in a business environment which is fundamentally changing. 

I asked Eric about brands leading the way in innovative sales.

Will Tizen give Android a run for its money?

Ask folks about mobile operating systems and most will probably tell you that it’s a two-horse race: Apple’s iOS versus Google’s Android.

The mobile OS landscape isn’t this way because other companies haven’t tried.

Microsoft has done some interesting things with Windows Phone, and Palm’s webOS looked pretty darn promising when it launched.

29% of UK smartphone owners have made a purchase using the mobile web

A new survey has found that the use of m-commerce has remained relatively stable in the past 12 months, suggesting that it’s failing to catch on with consumers.

Orange’s Exposure report found that 29% of smartphone owners had purchased an item using the mobile web in the past six months, compared to 24% in 2011.

This is despite the fact that smartphone ownership has increased from 41% to 49%, which you would think meant that people are becoming more comfortable with the technology.

A previous survey from Webcredible found that security concerns are one of the main barriers to m-commerce, and Orange’s survey seems to back that up.

Multichannel retailers need multichannel returns policies

Customers shopping from multichannel retailers will naturally expect that they can return their purchases to their local store. After all, it’s all the same company, isn’t it? 

It turns out that some companies are multichannel in name only. These are multichannel brands that sell and – theoretically – service customers and prospects across multiple channels, but all too often they are not joined up. The left hand doesn’t have a clue what the right one is doing, and seemingly doesn’t want to.

For example, some multichannel retailers don’t cater for returns in a sensible way, and they run the risk of losing customers and repeat business as a result…

A lesson from the U.K.: More iPhone sellers doesn’t mean prices will go down

American iPhone users have been quietly biding their time until Apple ends its exclusive contract with AT&T, hoping for better service, cheaper phones and lower monthly bills. But if the iPhone situation across the pond serves any example, those things aren’t likely to happen any time soon.

Starting January 14, Vodafone is set to start selling iPhones in the U.K. But the company’s cheapest deal will end up being more expensive over the lifetime of the device
than anything currently offered to iPhone users. That’s bad news for consumers who expected a little competition would make the iPhone more accessible to users.

How mobile networks can improve selector tools

With so many phones on the market, and different options for price plans, purchasing a mobile online can be a daunting prospect for customers.

This is where a good selector tool can be useful. It can assist customers to find a mobile and tariff that matches their needs, and can lead to increased customer confidence and more sales.

Search arrogance can easily backfire

In these days of digital goodness, I’m sure I’m not alone in noticing more and more brands using the phrase: ‘search for us online…’ in their ad campaigns. But this strategy has failed many, many times, so why do brands take the risk?

A quick scout around the digital media press, and obviously the
obligatory question posted on Twitter, revealed many examples of brands
using search in ads: