P2P

The sharing economy: 40+ peer-to-peer start-ups

Peer-to-peer services are starting to mess things up for real.

Which industries are next to be disrupted by the sharing economy? Will we cease to ‘own stuff’?

Whether you’ve only just heard about Airbnb, or are actively sharing your pride and joy via RelayRides, this is a disruptive business model that is expanding every quarter.

As Rachel Botsman eloquently puts it, many are learning to

  • Trust in strangers.
  • Value access over ownership.
  • Value experiences over owning stuff.

If you want hard numbers, Forbes magazine has estimated total revenues across the sharing and P2P companies could reach $3.5bn by 2014, with growth exceeding 25%.

So, here’s a decent sized list of companies focused on collaborative consumption, along with some warning shots, or notes of opposition from more traditional quarters. Once you’ve scrolled to the bottom, you’ll realise just how many of these companies there are.

France’s ‘three strikes’ piracy law hasn’t helped music or movie sales

What’s the best way to stamp out piracy? In France, the entertainment industry was successful in pushing a ‘three strikes’ law that would boot serial infringers from the web.

That went into effect in October 2010. So how’s it doing?

According to HADOPI, the agency tasked with administering and enforcing the law of the same name, things are going just great. 

A report it released, which looked at data for the 17-month period following the law’s implementation, claims that “illegal downloading [is] clearly on the decline in France.”

Visa launching P2P payments, but is it a decade late?

Visa’s motto may be “More people go with Visa,” but when it comes to payments between people, Visa and other major credit card associations are largely absent.

The market for P2P payments is instead dominated by newer players, such as PayPal, which has been around for less than a decade and a half. And more recently, a slew of startups is looking to create new markets and take advantage of untapped niches.

Is The Pirate Bay going legit?

If there was any group of individuals that you would expect to fight copyright holders to the bloody end, the people behind The Pirate Bay (TPB) were it. But apparently, a costly legal defeat can really take the wind out of just about any pirate’s sails.

According to a press release issued today, the owners of TBP have sold TBP to publicly-traded software company Global Gaming Factory X (GGF) for $7.8m and GGF “intends to launch new business models that allow compensation to the content providers and copyright owners“.

Leveraging the power of 50 Cent

fittyHis fans know him as “Fitty.” Call him whatever you want, but the ex-con turned rapper and pitchman has established a brand among the 15-to-35 year-old internet content user. Two of 50 Cent’s allied brands are claiming to have scored big numbers by attaching his name to peer-to-peer (P2P) related content.

The brands were Glaceau’s Vitaminwater Formula 50 and Right Guard’s Pure 50, a deodorant. Both brands worked with Brand Asset in 2008 to attach search results to branded content which could then be shared with other users. The results were reported at Wednesday’s P2P Market Conference in New York City. Both campaigns generated click-through rates over 4 percent and post-click engagement times of more than two minutes. Better yet, the campaigns were tied to legit content, linked from paid keywords. No illegal file sharing issues, which so often go along with P2P shared content, and no intellectual property disputes.