pay walls

2013: the year of paid content?

Paid content is and has been a big business — if you’re in the right market.

Unfortunately for consumer-oriented news organizations, the right market isn’t their market.

But could that be changing?

Does Slovakia hold the secret to paywall success?

Here’s a question most publishers would love to have an answer to: what’s the secret to building a successful pay wall?

Although one might expect major publishers like the New York Times to eventually provide the answer, newspapers in Slovakia may have beat their Western counterparts to the task.

Five big mistakes made by publishers

Publishing may be a tough business all around these days, but thanks to the internet, there are more publishers than ever.

Many of them won’t survive, of course. And the ones that die won’t just be traditional publishers that fail to adapt to the internet; there are plenty of digital publishers making potentially fatal mistakes too.

Newspaper circulation declines, even with free copies

Newspapers need help anywhere they can get it, and the Audit Bureau of Circulations is trying to help. Recently, it updated the rules it uses to calculate newspaper circulation.

One of the changes: free copies given to local schools and newspaper employees are now counted.

That should help, right? Apparently, it’s not that easy. Despite the Audit Bureau of Circulations’ good intentions, newspaper circulation in the U.S. continues to decline.

Forget the pay wall: introducing the like wall

Faced with the reality that viable businesses require revenue, more and more newspapers and magazines are erecting pay walls on their websites.

But paid content isn’t a panacea, and it’s far easier — and more comfortable — to erect a pay fence. Case in point: the New York Times, whose new pay wall features enough holes to fit a truck through.