penalties

Why Google needs to be less Kafkaesque

Joe Friedlein is the founder of Browser Media, a UK based search engine marketing agency. 

Browser Media has been the victim of a Google penalty which has seen its pages almost disappear from the SERPs. 

I’ve been asking Joe about the possible reasons for the penalty and his frustration at the Kafkaesque nature of Google’s (non)communication with webmasters. 

SEOs beware: Google preps over-optimisation penalty

Can you ever have too much of a good thing? According to Google, the answer is ‘yes’ when it comes to SEO.

In the past couple of years, the search giant has made a concerted effort to improve the quality of its index.

The measures taken are wide-ranging, from updates targeting content farms to the more recently announced penalty for pages with too many ads.

Now Google is apparently set to take its efforts one step further by targeting pages and sites it deems have been over-optimised.

Google issues a penalty to itself

Google doesn’t like paid links, sponsored posts and low-quality content. 

So it was quite surprising, and embarrassing, to learn this week that Google was associated with all three in an apparent effort to promote its web browser, Chrome.

That left Google with little ability but to respond and explain itself. And yesterday it did just that.

Is Google violating its own guidelines to promote Chrome?

Google might be paying big bucks to Mozilla to be Firefox’s default search provider, but its own browser Chrome is now by some counts more popular globally than Firefox itself.

Chalk it up to a good product, and Google’s improved ability to market its wares to mainstream consumers.

But is Google also using questionable tactics to promote Chrome? Surprisingly, the answer may be yes.

Best Mother’s Day gift? A bunch of paid links

Yesterday was Mother’s Day, but the flower companies that cash in on special occasions apparently weren’t just delivering flowers to mom.

According to the New York Times, Teleflora, FTD, 1800Flowers and ProFlowers were busy delivering paid links to Google in an effort to boost their rankings.