Pew Internet

The future of content marketing? Consult the feeds

Feed. Where I grew up in rural Santa Clara California, this meant alfalfa we shovelled to our horses.

Now, the word has an entirely different meaning to a global world of young digital natives, and understanding/collecting data on how these types of feeds are accessed and interacted with is going to be big business.

Where do you learn about breaking events? Consult the Twitter feed. Need to get caught up on family and friend’s whereabouts after a long- stint of no communication, that’s a Facebook feed.

For shopping you have your Pinterest feed – or, more importantly your followers Pinterest feed in order to get the latest visual porn around the products and brands that matter to you most. For personal expression, you have your Instagram or Tumblr feed.

Why search and email are still more important than social

When it comes to digital marketing channels, social media seems to capture more of the spotlight than search and email.

Yes, less is spent on social, but social is far more exciting, which explains why marketers love talking and writing about social.

Few dispute the importance of social media today, but a Pew Internet survey conducted in May 2011 and released yesterday is a reminder of why marketers shouldn’t let social become too big a distraction.

Forget tablets, e-readers are where the growth is at: report

Since Apple unveiled the iPad to the world, tablet devices have
attracted an immense spotlight. To some, they represent the future of
computing, publishing, advertising and, well, life as we know it.

But is the smoke from the tablet market obscuring even bigger fires
elsewhere? According to a study conducted by the Pew Research Center’s
Internet & American Life Project, e-reader ownership is growing
much, much faster than tablet ownership.

App culture, or app myopia?

If you work in technology or digital marketing, you probably take it for granted that mobile apps are a mainstream phenomenon. But is that really the case? Sort of, according to a new Pew Internet telephone survey.

According to the survey, 35% of adults in the United States have applications on their phone. That’s a fairly big number.