privacy

The GDPR claims its first victims

The GDPR goes into effect later this month and GDPR compliance efforts are well underway. For example, users of online services around the world are receiving notifications of updated terms of service and privacy policies.

Some of the updates contained in these agreements are significant. Facebook-owned WhatsApp, for instance, has increased its minimum age to 16. Snapchat isn’t abandoning users under 16, but it is changing how some of its features work for its under-16 userbase.

Companies around the world are worried about the GDPR: study

The GDPR is coming and even though it is an EU law, it will have a profound impact on businesses around the world, even those that don’t have a physical presence in the EU.

That’s because the GDPR’s protections apply to all individuals within the Union and non-EU companies that control or process data from individuals in EU are expected to register a representative and comply with the law. Those that don’t face stiff penalties, including fines of up to €20 million or 4% of global annual turnover.

GDPR requires privacy by design, but what is it and how can marketers comply?

Privacy by design is a fairly old concept in systems engineering and its general meaning is pretty obvious.

Wikipedia describes it as “not about data protection” but rather “designing so data doesn’t need protection,” with the “root principle based on enabling service without data control transfer from the citizen to the system” (i.e. the citizen is not identifiable or recognizable).

Highly targeted online ads don’t work: Stanford researchers

According to researchers at Stanford, highly targeted ads may not be all they’re cracked up to be.

Based on a mathematical model they built based on game theory, the researchers instead suggest that advertisers “prefer to remain in a state of partial willful ignorance so as to preserve communication credibility.”

biometric technology

Key trends in online identity verification (so everybody knows you’re a dog)

The Internet was once a more anonymous space. People hid their real identities, coming up with unique and sometimes bizarre pseudonyms to represent themselves on specific websites.

As services and socialising shifted online, identifying each other digitally has become increasingly important. 

How can we do this securely, without impacting users’ experience? I’ll explore the trends in online identity verification, looking at the key solutions and implications for businesses and users. 

The five-point plan for data privacy & business

On Friday I attended a talk at Data Protection 2016 that was all about – you guessed it – data, but specifically how businesses can continue to thrive in the ever-evolving data economy.   

The talk from Ctrl-Shift CEO Liz Brandt covered five key action points that business and government need to tackle together in order to avert a future crisis.

I’m going to cover them in detail in this post.