quantitative

Is there a crisis in meaningful measurement?

We all have an intuition as to the relevant merits or otherwise of ‘the impression’. If a blog post on Econsultancy gets 5,000+ views, I know it’s been relatively popular with our audience, considering we get around 1m views a month.

A lot of page views is generally a broad indicator of quality, at least on this blog. Quality could be defined as great entertainment, or helpful best practice.

Quality doesn’t necessarily dictate time spent on page, a great post can still be quick to digest. Nor does quality dictate a low bounce rate, especially as we get lots of views from social referral (of course, if time on page was 30 seconds, and bounce rate 96%, there would be mighty cause for concern).

If a post doesn’t get many views, but I receive some good comments from learned readers, I’ll generally be happy, and hope the post will bring in more traffic over time.

What am I trying to get at here? Well, measurement is a science and an art. There are trends that cannot be repudiated, as well as intuition that must be followed.

There are many ways to skin a cat, but the worst thing you can do is skin the cat without explaining why the cat was flayed in such a way.

In this post I’m going to look at a possible crisis in some areas of measurement and market research. Please add your comments below.