regulation

Influencers face crisis of confidence in light of CMA investigation

Last week, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) announced that it has launched an investigation into influencers who fail to disclose that they were compensated to post content on behalf of brands.

“Social media stars can have a big influence on what their followers do and buy. If people see clothes, cosmetics, a car, or a holiday being plugged by someone they admire, they might be swayed into buying it,” George Lusty, the CMA’s Senior Director for Consumer Protection, stated. “So, it’s really important they are clearly told whether a celebrity is promoting a product because they have bought it themselves, or because they have been paid or thanked in some way by the brand.”

Should brands be worried about the possible repeal of net neutrality rules?

The potential repeal of the 2015 net neutrality rules that were implemented in the U.S. by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has sparked an outcry from consumers, consumer rights groups, businesses and trade organizations.

Under a proposal unveiled last week, ISPs would, among other things, no longer be banned from charging companies to prioritize the delivery of their content or restricting access to particular online services that utilize significant resources.

How will Donald Trump’s policies affect fintech?

Last week, new US President Donald Trump signed a directive asking his Treasury secretary to review The Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Dodd-Frank was signed into law in 2010 by former President Barack Obama and was aimed at preventing another financial crisis like the one that struck the US banking system in 2008.

Microsoft refuses to back down on Do Not Track, wants more complexity

More than a decade ago, Microsoft was branded by the United States government as a greedy monopolist and the company’s existence was threatened by an antitrust lawsuit that could have resulted in the then-world’s largest software company being broken apart.

Today, memories of Microsoft’s past may have largely faded but the Redmond company is still trying to convince consumers that it’s cool, and perhaps more importantly, that it’s on their side. One of the ways it’s doing that: declaring its support for consumer privacy.

Does your company overestimate the value of an email address?

It may not be the new kid on the block, but email is, for many companies, one of the most effective and profitable digital marketing channels.

It’s not hard to understand why: an email address, like a physical address or phone number, gives companies a means to connect with a known individual across time and space, making it a compelling medium for relationship-building.

Do Not Track gains support, but will it really work?

Today, the administration of US President Barack Obama announced a blueprint for a “Privacy Bill of Rights.”

The goal: “improve consumers’ privacy protections” and “give users more control over how their personal information is used on the Internet”, all the while maintaining the internet’s status as an “engine for innovation and economic growth.”

To achieve that goal, the president has enlisted the help of some of the internet’s biggest names, including Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and AOL.