rentals

TV rentals: will Amazon’s pricing trump Apple’s brand?

Looking to watch the latest episode of your favorite TV show? Apple
wants to rent it to you. Yesterday, the Mountain View-based company
unveiled the latest incarnation of Apple TV. And like most of Apple’s
newest consumer electronics devices, behind the hardware is a business model to move content.

In addition to $4.99 high-definition movie rentals, Apple TV offers up
99 cent rentals of popular television shows from Fox and ABC. But will
Apple TV do for television shows what the iPod and iTunes did for
music? That may depend on how Apple deals with the competition. If the
counter attack Amazon has already launched is any indication, the
competition may be pretty fierce.

YouTube readies experiment with paid rentals

When Google purchased YouTube for $1.65bn in 2006, many questioned whether it could turn YouTube’s popularity into a big business.

Just over three years later, the answer appears to be ‘maybe‘. Google has made a lot of progress building an ad-supported business model for YouTube, but that alone might not be enough if YouTube is to realize its full potential.

Do cheap rentals hurt DVD sales? We may soon find out

Movie studios think cheap DVD rentals are a major factor in DVD sales that have been on the decline for some time. And now one of those studios, Warner Bros., may have the ability to prove the theory right or wrong.

That’s because rental giant Netflix has inked a deal with Warner Bros. under which Netflix won’t rent new Warner Bros. releases until they’ve been on sale for 28 days.