reporting

How to bring your PR in-house. Part four: tracking

In parts one to three of the this series on managing PR and blogger outreach in-house, I’ve guided you through: The Network, The Message, and Discovery/Dissemination, talking shop on tools of the trade to cut cost but still rock like a PR all-star.

In this final post on tracking, I’ll show you how to define clear objectives then get your reports together for the boss.

Is there a crisis in meaningful measurement?

We all have an intuition as to the relevant merits or otherwise of ‘the impression’. If a blog post on Econsultancy gets 5,000+ views, I know it’s been relatively popular with our audience, considering we get around 1m views a month.

A lot of page views is generally a broad indicator of quality, at least on this blog. Quality could be defined as great entertainment, or helpful best practice.

Quality doesn’t necessarily dictate time spent on page, a great post can still be quick to digest. Nor does quality dictate a low bounce rate, especially as we get lots of views from social referral (of course, if time on page was 30 seconds, and bounce rate 96%, there would be mighty cause for concern).

If a post doesn’t get many views, but I receive some good comments from learned readers, I’ll generally be happy, and hope the post will bring in more traffic over time.

What am I trying to get at here? Well, measurement is a science and an art. There are trends that cannot be repudiated, as well as intuition that must be followed.

There are many ways to skin a cat, but the worst thing you can do is skin the cat without explaining why the cat was flayed in such a way.

In this post I’m going to look at a possible crisis in some areas of measurement and market research. Please add your comments below.

Five simple attribution black holes to look out for in reporting

Having worked almost exclusively with retail websites for the last four years, I’ve spent a lot of time analysing data for different channels and trying to attribute value to specific marketing campaigns and projects.

Whilst doing this I’ve found a number of fairly obvious (only when you really think about it) potential threats to everyday attribution that I wanted to share.

Is Twitter a platform for real time reporting?

Management Today editor Matthew Gwyther is the latest print media veteran to stick the boot into Twitter, labelling it “a tedious fad we would do well to pull the G20 riot policeplug on”.

He lambasts the “news editors at the national newspapers” for wading into Twitter without adequate resources “to do it properly”, while accusing them of being “desperate to keep up with the Joneses”.

“The result is an unwholesome mess – a garbled Babel of nonsense that leaves you screaming for a return to the times when we could read all about it the day afterwards over our Cornflakes on a page of newsprint.”

Word to Matthew: you can read it afterwards! You don’t have to tune in to Twitter! It will all become clear the next day.

But there’s a place for Twitter – and a place for real time reporting too…