reporting

What probability and loss aversion can teach us about reporting results

An argument for not reporting results in marketing: if you find yourself in times of crisis having to report frequently, try reporting on actions rather than numbers.

Report on the things you did rather than the traffic you achieved.

Here is my argument for not reporting results in marketing…

How to bring your PR in-house. Part four: tracking

In parts one to three of the this series on managing PR and blogger outreach in-house, I’ve guided you through: The Network, The Message, and Discovery/Dissemination, talking shop on tools of the trade to cut cost but still rock like a PR all-star.

In this final post on tracking, I’ll show you how to define clear objectives then get your reports together for the boss.

Is there a crisis in meaningful measurement?

We all have an intuition as to the relevant merits or otherwise of ‘the impression’. If a blog post on Econsultancy gets 5,000+ views, I know it’s been relatively popular with our audience, considering we get around 1m views a month.

Five simple attribution black holes to look out for in reporting

Having worked almost exclusively with retail websites for the last four years, I’ve spent a lot of time analysing data for different channels and trying to attribute value to specific marketing campaigns and projects.

Whilst doing this I’ve found a number of fairly obvious (only when you really think about it) potential threats to everyday attribution that I wanted to share.