social commerce

What’s behind the success of China’s social commerce app Pinduoduo?

For most of us in the marketing and technology industries, the term ‘social commerce’ is a byword for ‘a bit of a flop’.

The initial dreams of a perfect harmony between social networks and ecommerce have gradually faded into a reality of unsuccessful Buy buttons and niche communities that failed to catch on, and with the exception of some recent positive press in Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends Report for 2018, that doesn’t show much sign of changing.

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The future of ecommerce according to Mary Meeker

Last Wednesday, Mary Meeker presented the 2018 edition of her annual Internet Trends report – one of the most highly-anticipated pieces of research in the digital world.

As ever, the 294-slide deck encapsulates the most pressing and hotly-debated topics in the industry, from data and personalisation to on-demand work, retail innovation, and China’s continued status as a world leader in internet markets.

In particular, the report’s section on ecommerce paints a fascinating picture of the trends that are likely to define the future of online retail: social media, personalisation, and subscriptions.

All the digital news you missed this week

If pasties and porn aren’t enough to tempt you to read our roundup of this week’s digital news, I don’t know what is.

I am not offering you a rather crude bribe, I promise all will become clear if you keep reading.

MADE.COM on the value of social commerce

Though social is now recognised as an integral part of the marketing mix, many still question its place in commerce.

That’s why it was so fascinating to catch up with Hannah Pilpel, social project manager at MADE.COM, to find out what value the brand finds in social.

Hannah revealed some stats as to the monetary value of a social shopper, as well as sharing the brand’s channel insight.

Five examples of peer approval in ecommerce

Social commerce is, to some, an oxymoron.

Why would I want my social networks sullied with special offers and calls to action?

With the ‘buy’ buttons implemented by Facebook and Twitter apparently having little to no success (why keep customers away from retailer websites?) there has to be a smarter way to use social dynamics in ecommerce.

There is. Retailers are starting to use social for retention, enabling their most valuable customers to gain prestige by featuring on the brand’s own website or social network.

Is Pinterest or Instagram better for driving ecommerce?

Marketers are very aware of the potential that social media holds for ecommerce retailers.

In particular, Pinterest and Instagram are proving to be popular with many brands, as the image-based networks enable them to provide engaging content directly to consumer’s devices.

Facebook wants to turn Pages into shops

The world’s largest social network has built a billion-dollar ad business, but its ambitions don’t end with advertising.

Now, according to a report, Facebook is upping its social commerce efforts and looking to turn Pages into hubs for shopping.

Is social shopping making a comeback?

At one point social shopping was hailed as the future of ecommerce.

Online shopping was supposed to be moving towards becoming a more social and collective experience, whereby users could share their shopping journeys, mimicking the sort of interaction that occurs in physical stores.

However, despite all of these predictions, true social commerce has failed to really gain traction with consumers or retailers.

Whilst social elements, such as sharing buttons, have been integrated into retail websites, the overall vision of social shopping has not yet come to fruition.